Menu
FRUKDE
société des amis de Pasteur
" Jeunes gens ! Ne vous laissez pas atteindre par le scepticisme dénigrant et stérile, ne vous laissez pas décourager par les tristesses de certaines heures qui passent sur une nation ! "
  • Vaniqa cream price usa

    Où rencontrer Pasteur dans Arbois

    Après les monuments dolois à l'effigie de Louis Pasteur, c'est au tour des sites arboisiens !
    Avec quelques anecdotes historiques en prime, Alain Marchal nous présente les statues, médaillons ou encore portraits qui honorent la mémoire de Louis Pasteur...

    > LIRE LA SUITE

  • [

    Online doctor vaniqa

    SALT LAKE online doctor vaniqa CITY, Sept. 09, 2020 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Health Catalyst, Inc. ("Health Catalyst", online doctor vaniqa Nasdaq. HCAT), a leading provider of data and analytics technology and services to healthcare organizations, today announced that Patrick Nelli, Chief Financial Officer, and Adam Brown, Senior Vice President, Investor Relations, will participate in the 2020 Cantor Global Virtual Healthcare Conference on Tuesday, September 15, 2020, which will include a fireside chat presentation at 1:20 p.m. ET.

    A live audio webcast and replay of this presentation will be available at https://ir.healthcatalyst.com/investor-relations.About Health CatalystHealth Catalyst is a leading provider of data and analytics technology and services to healthcare organizations committed to being the catalyst for massive, measurable, data-informed healthcare improvement. Its customers leverage the cloud-based data platform—powered by data from more than 100 million patient records and encompassing trillions of facts—as well as its analytics software and professional services expertise to make data-informed decisions and realize measurable clinical, financial, and operational improvements. Health Catalyst envisions a future in which all healthcare decisions are data informed.Health Catalyst Investor Relations Contact:Adam BrownSenior Vice President, Investor Relations+1 (855)-309-6800ir@healthcatalyst.comHealth Catalyst Media Contact:Kristen BerryVice President, Public Relations+1 (617) 234-4123+1 (774) 573-0455 (m)kberry@we-worldwide.com Source. Health Catalyst, Inc.SALT LAKE CITY, Sept. 8, 2020 /PRNewswire/ -- Health Catalyst, Inc.

    ("Health Catalyst," Nasdaq. HCAT), a leading provider of data and analytics technology and services to healthcare organizations, today announced that it has completed its seventh annual and first ever virtual Healthcare Analytics Summit (HAS), with record registration of more than 3,500 attendees. Keynotes included Dr. Amy Abernethy, Principal Deputy Commissioner and Acting CIO of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, Michael Dowling, CEO of Northwell Health, Vice Admiral Raquel Bono, MD, and many others.

    Other business updates include:The Vitalware, LLC ("VitalWare"), transaction has closed, and integration is underway of the Yakima, Washington-based provider of revenue workflow optimization and analytics SaaS technology solutions for health organizations. This is another example of Health Catalyst's ability to scale software on top of its cloud-based Data Operating System (DOS™). DOS will further enhance the analytics insights made available by Vitalware's technology by combining charge and revenue data with claims, cost, and quality data. Vitalware's flagship offering is a Best in KLAS chargemaster management solution that delivers results for the complex regulatory and compliance functions needed by all healthcare provider systems. "As announced on August 11, 2020, we entered into an acquisition agreement to acquire Vitalware and expected to close the acquisition in Q3 or Q4 of 2020.

    We are pleased to announce that we closed the acquisition on September 1, 2020. We are thrilled to formalize the combination of our solutions for the benefit of our customers and the industry," said CEO Dan Burton. On its upcoming Q3 2020 earnings call, Health Catalyst will share the impact of Vitalware on its Q3 2020 financial performance, which will not be significant given the timing of the acquisition, as well as update its full year 2020 guidance to include the impact of Vitalware. Health Catalyst Co-Founder Steve Barlow has returned from his three-year full-time volunteer mission for the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints, having served as Mission President of the Ecuador Quito Mission. He has rejoined Health Catalyst's companywide Leadership Team as a Senior Vice President, responsible for some of the company's largest customer relationships.

    Dan Burton said, "We couldn't be more excited about Steve's return to Health Catalyst. His energy, dedication and commitment to transforming healthcare launched our journey and will continue to make us better and stronger. Steve is leading and overseeing all aspects of our partnerships with some of our largest and longest-standing customers. Steve's extraordinary experience and capability enable him to be a critical partner and leader in enabling these customers' continued improvement and success." "My experience over the past three years in Ecuador reinforced for me how fortunate I am to be in a country with high-quality healthcare," said Barlow. "It has been invigorating to return to Health Catalyst and witness the incredible growth and expansion that has occurred over the past few years.

    We are better positioned than ever before to achieve our mission of being the catalyst for massive, measurable, data-informed healthcare improvement. I am grateful to be reunited with our longstanding team members and customers, and I'm thrilled to get to know and work alongside our new customers and teammates in this critical work." Effective October 1, 2020, Chief Technology Officer Dale Sanders will be transitioning to a Senior Advisor role with Health Catalyst, and the company is pleased to announce that one of Dale's longtime protégés and colleagues, Bryan Hinton, will serve as Health Catalyst's next Chief Technology Officer. Hinton joined Health Catalyst in 2012 and currently serves as the Senior Vice President and General Manager of the DOS Platform Business. He will continue to lead this business in addition to assuming the responsibilities of CTO. He has been instrumental in the development and integration of DOS and has been working directly with Dale and other technology leaders at Health Catalyst for many years.

    His experience prior to joining Health Catalyst includes four years with the .NET Development Center of Excellence at The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints, where he established the architectural guidance of all .NET projects. Previously, at Intel, he was responsible for the development and implementation of Intel's factory data warehouse product installed at Intel global factories. Hinton graduated from Brigham Young University with a BS in Computer Science. "Dale has been central to Health Catalyst's growth and success and we are grateful to him for his many years of service to our company and to the broader healthcare industry," said Dan Burton, CEO of Health Catalyst. "Thanks to Dale's vision, passion, innovative thinking and broad-based industry experience and perspective, Health Catalyst has grown from a handful of clients to a large number of organizations relying on us as their digital transformation partner, helping the healthcare ecosystem to constantly learn and improve.

    Dale's technology leadership was critical to the company's overall maturation, and I am convinced that we could not have grown and scaled as we have without Dale's foundational leadership and contributions. We are grateful to continue our association with Dale in the months and years ahead in his next role as a Senior Advisor to the company." Burton added, "We are thrilled to see Bryan Hinton take on this added role after having demonstrated his technology leadership prowess during the course of his tenure at Health Catalyst and having been mentored by Dale for many years. Bryan is well-prepared and ready for this additional responsibility, and we extend our congratulations to him." "I feel like a parent saying goodbye to my kids at their college graduation," said Dale Sanders. "Many of the concepts we first developed and applied over 20 years ago at Intermountain and then later refined during my tenure as CIO at Northwestern had a big influence on our technology and products at Health Catalyst. The vision of the Data Operating System and its application ecosystem originated in the real-world healthcare operations and research trenches of Northwestern.

    At Health Catalyst, I had the wonderful opportunity to lead the teams who made that vision a reality for the benefit of the entire industry. None of it would have been possible without Bryan Hinton leading the DOS team and Eric Just and Dan Unger leading the application development teams. We've been working side-by-side for many years to make the vision real. Bryan is the consummate modern CTO from outside of healthcare that healthcare needs. I've always described Eric as having a manufacturing engineer's mindset with a healthcare data and software engineer's skills, with Dan Unger leveraging his deep domain expertise in financial transformation to oversee the development of meaningful applications and solutions so relevant for CFOs.

    I'm honored and thrilled to step aside and turn the future over to their very capable hands. Under their leadership, the best is yet to come for Health Catalyst's technology." About Health CatalystHealth Catalyst is a leading provider of data and analytics technology and services to healthcare organizations, and is committed to being the catalyst for massive, measurable, data-informed healthcare improvement. Its customers leverage the cloud-based data platform—powered by data from more than 100 million patient records and encompassing trillions of facts—as well as its analytics software and professional services expertise to make data-informed decisions and realize measurable clinical, financial and operational improvements. Health Catalyst envisions a future in which all healthcare decisions are data informed.Health Catalyst Media Contact:Kristen BerrySenior Vice President, Public Relations+1 (617) 234-4123HealthCatalyst@we-worldwide.com View original content to download multimedia:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/health-catalyst-completes-hosting-of-the-largest-ever-healthcare-analytics-summit-and-announces-the-close-of-the-vitalware-acquisition-301125125.htmlSOURCE Health Catalyst.

    Vaniqa cream price usa

    Vaniqa
    Under eye cream
    Refreshing fruit pack
    Discount price
    No
    Online
    No
    Over the counter
    At walgreens
    Online Pharmacy
    No
    Effect on blood pressure
    14h
    7h
    1h
    UK pharmacy price
    Yes
    No
    Online
    Possible side effects
    13.9% 15g
    15ml
    100g
    Price per pill
    Abnormal vision
    Flu-like symptoms
    Memory problems
    Buy with echeck
    Pharmacy
    On the market
    Online Pharmacy

    The Register of Innovative Drugs is maintained pursuant vaniqa cream price usa to C.08.004.1 of the Food and Drug Regulations. The register indicates the drugs that are eligible for data protection. Under C.08.004.1 (3) a subsequent manufacturer that seeks a notice of compliance on the basis of a direct or indirect comparison between the new drug and an innovative drug may not file a submission before the end of a period of six years after the day on which the first vaniqa cream price usa notice of compliance was issued for the innovative new drug.

    In addition, the notice of compliance cannot be issued before the end of a period of eight years after the day on which the first notice of compliance was issued to the innovator. The format vaniqa cream price usa of the Register of Innovative Drugs is an electronic table, which is updated weekly. The register lists, in alphabetical order, the medicinal ingredients in the innovative drugs which were not previously approved in a drug by the Minister and that are not variations of a previously approved medicinal ingredient.

    Please note vaniqa cream price usa that there may be other medicinal ingredients included in the drugs. The register was re-formatted in summer 2016 to increase the clarity of the information provided regarding the medicinal ingredient, brand name and manufacturer of each innovative drug. For information related to treatment options, choices of medications and their uses, illnesses, side effects or drug interactions, please vaniqa cream price usa contact your health care professional (for example, doctor, pharmacist, etc.).

    We do not provide medical advice regarding the use of the products identified in this database. For comments or questions, please contact by hc.opml-bmbl.sc@canada.ca or by telephone vaniqa cream price usa at 613-941-7281.What is the Notice of Compliance (NOC) Data Extract?. The data extract is a series of compressed ASCII text files of the database.

    The uncompressed size of the files is approximately 19.0 MB. In order to utilize the data, the file must be loaded vaniqa cream price usa into an existing database or information system. The typical user is most likely a third party claims adjudicator, provincial formulary, insurance company, etc.

    A casual user of this file must be familiar with vaniqa cream price usa database structure and capable of setting up queries. The "Read me" file contains the data structure required to download the zipped files. The NOC extract files vaniqa cream price usa have been updated.

    They contain Health Canada authorization dates for all drugs dating back to 1994 that have received an NOC. All NOCs issued between 1991 and 1993 can be found in vaniqa cream price usa the NOC listings. Please note any Portable Document Format (PDF) files visible on the NOC database are not part of the data extracts.

    For more information, please go to vaniqa cream price usa the Read Me File. Data Extracts - Last updated. September 4, 2020 Copyright For information on copyright and who to contact, please visit the Notice of Compliance Online Database Terms and Conditions..

    The Register of Innovative Drugs is maintained pursuant to C.08.004.1 of online doctor vaniqa the Food and Drug Regulations. The register indicates the drugs that are eligible for data protection. Under C.08.004.1 (3) a subsequent manufacturer that seeks a notice of compliance on the basis of a direct or indirect comparison between the new drug and online doctor vaniqa an innovative drug may not file a submission before the end of a period of six years after the day on which the first notice of compliance was issued for the innovative new drug. In addition, the notice of compliance cannot be issued before the end of a period of eight years after the day on which the first notice of compliance was issued to the innovator.

    The format of the Register of Innovative Drugs is an online doctor vaniqa electronic table, which is updated weekly. The register lists, in alphabetical order, the medicinal ingredients in the innovative drugs which were not previously approved in a drug by the Minister and that are not variations of a previously approved medicinal ingredient. Please note that there may be other online doctor vaniqa medicinal ingredients included in the drugs. The register was re-formatted in summer 2016 to increase the clarity of the information provided regarding the medicinal ingredient, brand name and manufacturer of each innovative drug.

    For information related to treatment options, choices of medications and online doctor vaniqa their uses, illnesses, side effects or drug interactions, please contact your health care professional (for example, doctor, pharmacist, etc.). We do not provide medical advice regarding the use of the products identified in this database. For comments or questions, please contact by hc.opml-bmbl.sc@canada.ca or by telephone at 613-941-7281.What is the Notice online doctor vaniqa of Compliance (NOC) Data Extract?. The data extract is a series of compressed ASCII text files of the database.

    The uncompressed size of the files is approximately 19.0 MB. In order to utilize the data, the file must be loaded into online doctor vaniqa an existing database or information system. The typical user is most likely a third party claims adjudicator, provincial formulary, insurance company, etc. A casual user of this online doctor vaniqa file must be familiar with database structure and capable of setting up queries.

    The "Read me" file contains the data structure required to download the zipped files. The NOC extract files have been online doctor vaniqa updated. They contain Health Canada authorization dates for all drugs dating back to 1994 that have received an NOC. All NOCs issued between 1991 and 1993 can be found in online doctor vaniqa the NOC listings.

    Please note any Portable Document Format (PDF) files visible on the NOC database are not part of the data extracts. For more information, please go to the Read Me online doctor vaniqa File. Data Extracts - Last updated. September 4, 2020 Copyright For information on copyright and who to contact, please visit the Notice of Compliance Online Database Terms and Conditions..

    How should I take Vaniqa?

    Eflornithine is for external use only. Apply Eflornithine exactly as directed by your doctor. If you do not understand these directions, ask your pharmacist, nurse, or doctor to explain them to you. Eflornithine does not permanently remove hair or "cure" unwanted facial hair. It is not a hair remover (depilatory). You will need to continue using your current hair removal techniques. Eflornithine will help you manage your condition and improve your appearance. his medicine is for external use only. The cream is usually applied twice daily, at least eight hours apart, or as directed by your doctor. Wash your hands before and after each application. Remove any facial hair that is present using your current hair removal techniques. Wait at least 5 minutes after hair removal before applying Eflornithine. Apply a thin layer of cream to the affected areas of the face and nearby affected areas under the chin and rub it in thoroughly. Do not wash the treatment areas for at least 4 hours after application. Avoid getting this medication in your eyes, nose, or mouth. If this occurs, wash the area with water. If the cream gets in your eyes, rinse them thoroughly with water and contact your doctor. Eflornithine may cause temporary redness, rash, burning, stinging, or tingling, especially if it is applied to broken or irritated skin. If irritation develops, reduce the application of Eflornithine to once a day. If irritation continues, stop using the cream and contact your doctor. Cosmetics or sunscreen may be used after applying Eflornithine, but you should wait a few minutes to allow the treatment to be absorbed before applying them.

    Vaniqa coupon walmart

    First-of-its-kind study, based on a mouse model, finds living in a polluted environment could be comparable to eating a high-fat diet, leading to a pre-diabetic state CLEVELAND—Air pollution is the world’s leading environmental risk factor, and vaniqa coupon walmart causes more than nine million deaths per year. New research published in the Journal of Clinical Investigation shows air pollution may play a role in the development of cardiometabolic diseases, such as diabetes. Importantly, the vaniqa coupon walmart effects were reversible with cessation of exposure.

    Researchers found that air pollution was a “risk factor for a risk factor” that contributed to the common soil of other fatal problems like heart attack and stroke. Similar to how an unhealthy diet and lack of exercise can lead to disease, exposure to air pollution could be added to this risk factor list as well. “In this study, we created an environment that mimicked a polluted day in New Delhi or Beijing,” said Sanjay Rajagopalan, MD, first author on the study, Chief of Cardiovascular Medicine at University Hospitals Harrington Heart and Vascular Institute, and Director of the Case Western Reserve University Cardiovascular Research Institute vaniqa coupon walmart.

    €œWe concentrated fine particles of air pollution, called PM2.5 (particulate matter component <. 2.5 microns) vaniqa coupon walmart. Concentrated particles like this develop from human impact on the environment, such as automobile exhaust, power generation and other fossil fuels.” These particles have been strongly connected to risk factors for disease.

    For example, cardiovascular effects of air pollution can lead to heart attack and stroke. The research team has shown vaniqa coupon walmart exposure to air pollution can increase the likelihood of the same risk factors that lead to heart disease, such as insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. In the mouse model study, three groups were observed.

    A control group receiving clean filtered air, a group exposed to polluted air for 24 weeks, and a group fed a high-fat diet. Interestingly, the researchers found that being vaniqa coupon walmart exposed to air pollution was comparable to eating a high-fat diet. Both the air pollution and high-fat diet groups showed insulin resistance and abnormal metabolism – just like one would see in a pre-diabetic state.

    These changes were associated with changes in vaniqa coupon walmart the epigenome, a layer of control that can masterfully turn on and turn off thousands of genes, representing a critical buffer in response to environmental factors. This study is the first-of-its-kind to compare genome-wide epigenetic changes in response to air pollution, compare and contrast these changes with that of eating an unhealthy diet, and examine the impact of air pollution cessation on these changes.“The good news is that these effects were reversible, at least in our experiments” added Dr. Rajagopalan.

    €œOnce the air pollution vaniqa coupon walmart was removed from the environment, the mice appeared healthier and the pre-diabetic state seemed to reverse.” Dr. Rajagopalan explains that if you live in a densely polluted environment, taking actions such as wearing an N95 mask, using portable indoor air cleaners, utilizing air conditioning, closing car windows while commuting, and changing car air filters frequently could all be helpful in staying healthy and limiting air pollution exposure.Next steps in this research involve meeting with a panel of experts, as well as the National Institutes of Health, to discuss conducting clinical trials that compare heart health and the level of air pollution in the environment. For example, if someone has a heart attack, should they be wearing an N95 mask or using a portable air filter at home during recovery?.

    Dr vaniqa coupon walmart. Rajagopalan and his team believe that it is important to address the environment as a population health risk factor and continue to diligently research these issues. The authors also note that these findings should encourage policymakers to enact measures aimed at reducing air pollution.Shyam vaniqa coupon walmart Biswal, PhD, Professor in the Department of Environmental Health and Engineering at Johns Hopkins University School of Public Health, is the joint senior author on the study.

    Drs. Rajagopalan and Biswal are co-PIs on the NIH grant that supported this work.###Rajagopalan, S., Biswal, S., et al. €œMetabolic effects vaniqa coupon walmart of air pollution exposure and reversibility.” Journal of Clinical Investigation.

    DOI. 10.1172/JCI137315. This work was supported by the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences TaRGET II Consortium grant U01ES026721, as well as grants R01ES015146 and R01ES019616.About one in five women experience some form of depression during pregnancy, with poorly understood effects on the fetus.

    Prenatal depression is linked to behavioural and developmental issues in children as well as an increased risk for depression as young adults. But how prenatal depression leads to these changes remains unclear. UCalgary researcher Dr.

    Catherine Lebel, PhD, is helping understand what may be happening in the developing brains of these children. The research team has shown that young children whose mothers experienced more numerous symptoms of depression in pregnancy have weakened connectivity in brain pathways involved in emotion. These structural changes can be related to increased hyperactivity and aggression in boys.

    The research is based on diffusion magnetic resonance imaging, an imaging technique that probes the strength of structural connections between brain regions. The findings are published in The Journal of Neuroscience. Catherine Lebel, senior author and investigator.

    Riley Brandt, University of Calgary “The results help us understand how depression can have multigenerational impacts, and speaks to the importance of helping mothers who may be experiencing depression during pregnancy,” says Lebel, an associate professor at the Cumming School of Medicine, and researcher in the Alberta Children’s Hospital Research Institute. She holds the Canada Research Chair in Paediatric Neuroimaging. Lebel and her team studied 54 Calgary mothers and their children.

    They were enrolled from the ongoing, prospective study called the Alberta Pregnancy Outcomes and Nutrition study. Mothers answered a survey about their depression symptoms at several points during their pregnancy. Their children were followed after birth and undertook an MRI scan at the Alberta Children’s Hospital at around age four.

    As well, the children’s behaviour was assessed within six months of their MRI scan. The team found a significant reduction in structural brain connectivity between the amygdala, a structure essential for emotional processing, and the frontal cortex. Weakened connectivity between the amygdala and frontal cortex is associated with disruptive behaviours and vulnerability to depression.

    The first author on the study, Dr. Rebecca Hay, MD, stresses the importance of recognition of depression and intervention in prenatal health. €œThese results suggest complex associations between the prenatal environment and children’s brain development, and may help us to understand why children of depressed mothers are more vulnerable to depression themselves,” says Hay, a resident physician in paediatrics and recent Cumming School of Medicine graduate.

    The main clinical takeaway from this is to emphasize the importance of recognizing, treating prenatal depression and supporting mothers, both for better maternal outcomes and to help future child development. Rebecca Hay, the study's first author. Courtesy Rebecca Hay Current study looks at stress during pandemic Lebel and her research team are currently trying to understand how stress and mental health are affecting pregnant women during the COVID-19 pandemic.

    She is examining how factors such as social supports might mitigate stress, and how this may influence pregnancy and birth outcomes. If you are interested, you can get involved here in the Pregnancy During the COVID-19 Pandemic study at the University of Calgary. So far, approximately 7,500 women from across Canada are enrolled and supplying information through questionnaires.

    €œIt is critical to appropriately recognize and treat prenatal maternal mental health problems, both for the mothers and to improve child outcomes,” says Lebel. €œNow more than ever, with increased stress, anxiety and depression during the COVID-19 pandemic, we should do more to support mothers to positively impact the health of their children.” Lebel is an associate professor in the Department of Radiology at the Cumming School of Medicine, adjunct associate professor in the Werklund School of Education and a member of The Mathison Centre for Mental Health Research &. Education, Owerko Centre at ACHRI, Hotchkiss Brain Institute and Alberta Children's Hospital Research Institute.

    The study was funded by the Canadian Institute of Health Research, Alberta Innovates - Health Solutions, the Alberta Children's Hospital Foundation, the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, the Mach-Gaensslen Foundation, and an Eyes High University of Calgary Postdoctoral Scholar. Led by the Hotchkiss Brain Institute, Brain and Mental Health is one of six research strategies guiding the University of Calgary toward its Eyes High goals. The strategy provides a unifying direction for brain and mental health research at the university..

    First-of-its-kind study, based on a mouse model, finds living in a polluted environment could be comparable to eating a high-fat diet, leading to online doctor vaniqa a pre-diabetic state CLEVELAND—Air pollution is the world’s leading environmental risk factor, and causes more than nine million deaths per year. New research published in the Journal of Clinical Investigation shows air pollution may play a role in the development of cardiometabolic diseases, such as diabetes. Importantly, the effects were reversible with cessation online doctor vaniqa of exposure. Researchers found that air pollution was a “risk factor for a risk factor” that contributed to the common soil of other fatal problems like heart attack and stroke.

    Similar to how an unhealthy diet and lack of exercise can lead to disease, exposure to air pollution could be added to this risk factor list as well. “In this study, we created an environment that mimicked a polluted day in New Delhi or Beijing,” said Sanjay Rajagopalan, MD, first author on the study, Chief of Cardiovascular Medicine online doctor vaniqa at University Hospitals Harrington Heart and Vascular Institute, and Director of the Case Western Reserve University Cardiovascular Research Institute. €œWe concentrated fine particles of air pollution, called PM2.5 (particulate matter component <. 2.5 microns) online doctor vaniqa.

    Concentrated particles like this develop from human impact on the environment, such as automobile exhaust, power generation and other fossil fuels.” These particles have been strongly connected to risk factors for disease. For example, cardiovascular effects of air pollution can lead to heart attack and stroke. The research team has shown exposure to air online doctor vaniqa pollution can increase the likelihood of the same risk factors that lead to heart disease, such as insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. In the mouse model study, three groups were observed.

    A control group receiving clean filtered air, a group exposed to polluted air for 24 weeks, and a group fed a high-fat diet. Interestingly, the researchers found that being online doctor vaniqa exposed to air pollution was comparable to eating a high-fat diet. Both the air pollution and high-fat diet groups showed insulin resistance and abnormal metabolism – just like one would see in a pre-diabetic state. These changes were associated with changes in the epigenome, a layer of control that can masterfully turn on and turn off thousands of online doctor vaniqa genes, representing a critical buffer in response to environmental factors.

    This study is the first-of-its-kind to compare genome-wide epigenetic changes in response to air pollution, compare and contrast these changes with that of eating an unhealthy diet, and examine the impact of air pollution cessation on these changes.“The good news is that these effects were reversible, at least in our experiments” added Dr. Rajagopalan. €œOnce the air pollution was removed from the environment, the mice appeared healthier and the pre-diabetic state seemed to reverse.” online doctor vaniqa Dr. Rajagopalan explains that if you live in a densely polluted environment, taking actions such as wearing an N95 mask, using portable indoor air cleaners, utilizing air conditioning, closing car windows while commuting, and changing car air filters frequently could all be helpful in staying healthy and limiting air pollution exposure.Next steps in this research involve meeting with a panel of experts, as well as the National Institutes of Health, to discuss conducting clinical trials that compare heart health and the level of air pollution in the environment.

    For example, if someone has a heart attack, should they be wearing an N95 mask or using a portable air filter at home during recovery?. Dr online doctor vaniqa. Rajagopalan and his team believe that it is important to address the environment as a population health risk factor and continue to diligently research these issues. The authors also note that these findings should encourage policymakers to enact measures aimed at reducing air pollution.Shyam Biswal, PhD, Professor in the Department of Environmental Health and Engineering at Johns Hopkins University School of Public online doctor vaniqa Health, is the joint senior author on the study.

    Drs. Rajagopalan and Biswal are co-PIs on the NIH grant that supported this work.###Rajagopalan, S., Biswal, S., et al. €œMetabolic effects of air pollution online doctor vaniqa exposure and reversibility.” Journal of Clinical Investigation. DOI.

    10.1172/JCI137315. This work was supported by the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences TaRGET II Consortium grant U01ES026721, as well as grants R01ES015146 and R01ES019616.About one in five women experience some form of depression during pregnancy, with poorly understood effects on the fetus. Prenatal depression is linked to behavioural and developmental issues in children as well as an increased risk for depression as young adults. But how prenatal depression leads to these changes remains unclear.

    UCalgary researcher Dr. Catherine Lebel, PhD, is helping understand what may be happening in the developing brains of these children. The research team has shown that young children whose mothers experienced more numerous symptoms of depression in pregnancy have weakened connectivity in brain pathways involved in emotion. These structural changes can be related to increased hyperactivity and aggression in boys.

    The research is based on diffusion magnetic resonance imaging, an imaging technique that probes the strength of structural connections between brain regions. The findings are published in The Journal of Neuroscience. Catherine Lebel, senior author and investigator. Riley Brandt, University of Calgary “The results help us understand how depression can have multigenerational impacts, and speaks to the importance of helping mothers who may be experiencing depression during pregnancy,” says Lebel, an associate professor at the Cumming School of Medicine, and researcher in the Alberta Children’s Hospital Research Institute.

    She holds the Canada Research Chair in Paediatric Neuroimaging. Lebel and her team studied 54 Calgary mothers and their children. They were enrolled from the ongoing, prospective study called the Alberta Pregnancy Outcomes and Nutrition study. Mothers answered a survey about their depression symptoms at several points during their pregnancy.

    Their children were followed after birth and undertook an MRI scan at the Alberta Children’s Hospital at around age four. As well, the children’s behaviour was assessed within six months of their MRI scan. The team found a significant reduction in structural brain connectivity between the amygdala, a structure essential for emotional processing, and the frontal cortex. Weakened connectivity between the amygdala and frontal cortex is associated with disruptive behaviours and vulnerability to depression.

    The first author on the study, Dr. Rebecca Hay, MD, stresses the importance of recognition of depression and intervention in prenatal health. €œThese results suggest complex associations between the prenatal environment and children’s brain development, and may help us to understand why children of depressed mothers are more vulnerable to depression themselves,” says Hay, a resident physician in paediatrics and recent Cumming School of Medicine graduate. The main clinical takeaway from this is to emphasize the importance of recognizing, treating prenatal depression and supporting mothers, both for better maternal outcomes and to help future child development.

    Rebecca Hay, the study's first author. Courtesy Rebecca Hay Current study looks at stress during pandemic Lebel and her research team are currently trying to understand how stress and mental health are affecting pregnant women during the COVID-19 pandemic. She is examining how factors such as social supports might mitigate stress, and how this may influence pregnancy and birth outcomes. If you are interested, you can get involved here in the Pregnancy During the COVID-19 Pandemic study at the University of Calgary.

    So far, approximately 7,500 women from across Canada are enrolled and supplying information through questionnaires. €œIt is critical to appropriately recognize and treat prenatal maternal mental health problems, both for the mothers and to improve child outcomes,” says Lebel. €œNow more than ever, with increased stress, anxiety and depression during the COVID-19 pandemic, we should do more to support mothers to positively impact the health of their children.” Lebel is an associate professor in the Department of Radiology at the Cumming School of Medicine, adjunct associate professor in the Werklund School of Education and a member of The Mathison Centre for Mental Health Research &. Education, Owerko Centre at ACHRI, Hotchkiss Brain Institute and Alberta Children's Hospital Research Institute.

    The study was funded by the Canadian Institute of Health Research, Alberta Innovates - Health Solutions, the Alberta Children's Hospital Foundation, the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, the Mach-Gaensslen Foundation, and an Eyes High University of Calgary Postdoctoral Scholar. Led by the Hotchkiss Brain Institute, Brain and Mental Health is one of six research strategies guiding the University of Calgary toward its Eyes High goals. The strategy provides a unifying direction for brain and mental health research at the university..

    Low cost vaniqa

    Etchells E, Ho M, Shojania KG low cost vaniqa. Value of small sample sizes in rapid-cycle quality improvement projects. BMJ Qual low cost vaniqa Safe 2016;25:202–6.The article has been corrected since it was published online. The authors want to alert readers to the following error identified in the published version. The error is in the last paragraph of the section “Small samples can make ‘rapid improvement’ Rapid”, wherein the minimum sample size has been considered as six instead of eight.For this first (convenience) sample of 10 volunteer users, 5/10 low cost vaniqa (50%) completed the form without any input or instructions.

    The other five became frustrated and gave up. Table 1 tells you that, with an observed success rate of 50% and a desired target low cost vaniqa of 90%, any audit with a sample of six or more allows you to confidently reject the null hypothesis that your form is working at a 90% success rate.For decades, those working in hospitals normalised the incessant alarms from medical devices as a necessary, almost comforting, reality of a high tech industry. While nurses drowned in excessive, frequently uninformative alarms, other members of the healthcare team often paid little attention. Fortunately, times are changing and managing alarm fatigue is now a key patient safety priority in acute care environments.1Adverse patient events from alarm fatigue, particularly related low cost vaniqa to excessive physiological monitor alarms, have received widespread attention over the last decade, including from the news media.2–5 In the USA, hospitals redoubled alarm safety efforts following the 2013 Joint Commission Sentinel Event Alert and subsequent National Patient Safety Goals on alarm safety.1 2 6 We are now beginning to understand how to reduce excessive non-actionable alarms (including invalid alarms as well as those that are valid but not actionable or informative),7 8 better manage alarm notifications and ultimately improve patient safety. Alarm data are readily available and measuring alarm response time during patient care is possible.7 9 Yet we have few high-quality reports describing clear improvement to clinical alarm burden, and most published interventions are of limited scope, duration or both.10 11 To demonstrate value in alarm quality improvement (QI) efforts moving forward, we need more rigorous evidence for interventions and more meaningful outcome measures.In this issue of BMJ Quality and Safety, Pater et al12 report the results of a comprehensive multidisciplinary alarm management QI project executed over 3½ years in a 17-bed paediatric acute care cardiology unit.

    The primary project low cost vaniqa goal was to reduce alarm notifications from continuous bedside monitoring. Although limited to a single unit, the project is an important contribution to the scant literature on alarm management in paediatric settings for three reasons. First, the initiative lasted longer than most that have been reported, which allowed for tailoring of alarm interventions to the needs of the unit and patient population and measuring the impacts and sustainability over time. Second, the scope of the intervention bundle encompassed low cost vaniqa a wide variety of changes including adoption of a smartphone notification system. Addition of time delays between when alarm thresholds are violated and when an alarm notification is issued.

    Implementation of an alarm notification escalation algorithm after a certain amount of time in alarm threshold low cost vaniqa violation. Deactivation of numerous technical alarms (such as respiratory lead detachment). Monitoring of low cost vaniqa electrode lead replacement every 24 hours. And discussion of alarm parameters on daily rounds. Third, the authors introduced low cost vaniqa a novel strategy for reducing the stress that alarms may cause patients and families by deactivating inroom alarm audio, although no outcomes were reported attributable directly to this component of the intervention.This project constitutes an important contribution to the published literature.

    However, Pater et al faced two challenges that are ubiquitous in the field of clinical alarm management. (1) Identification of low cost vaniqa meaningful outcome measures and (2) Lack of high-quality evidence for most interventions. With regards to the first challenge, the primary outcome measure used in the study comprised ‘initial alarm notifications’, defined as the first notification of a monitor alarm delivered to the nurse’s mobile device. Although initial alarm notifications declined by 68% following the intervention, these notifications accounted for only about half of all alarm notifications. The other half included second and third notifications for alarms exceeding specified delay thresholds, which were sent both to the mobile device low cost vaniqa of the primary nurse and to ‘buddy’ nurses, potentially increasing alarm burden.

    On the other hand, eliminating inroom audible alarms may have reduced the perceived alarm burden for nurses compared with having both bedside and mobile device notifications. Determining the true benefit of a reduction in a subset of alarms presents complex challenges.Alarm frequency is the most commonly used outcome measure in alarm research and QI projects, but reduction in alarms does not necessarily indicate improved low cost vaniqa patient safety or a highly functional alarm management system. Alarm reduction could easily be achieved in an undesirable way by simply turning off alarms. Unfortunately, most studies low cost vaniqa have not been powered to statistically evaluate improvements in patient safety. (Pater et al did monitor patient safety balancing measures, which remained stable after intervention implementation).

    To assess change low cost vaniqa in nurses’ perceptions of alarm frequency, Pater et al conducted a prepost survey, which despite the small sample size (n=38 preintervention and n=25 postintervention) managed to show improvement, with the percentage of nurses agreeing they could respond to alarms appropriately and quickly increasing from 32% to 76% (p<0.001). That said, this survey was not a validated measure of alarm fatigue. In fact, we currently have no widely low cost vaniqa accepted, validated tool for assessing alarm fatigue.11As we look towards future evaluations of alarm management strategies, the focus needs to shift away from simply reducing the frequency of alarms to more meaningful outcome metrics. In addition to alarm rates, outcomes such as response time to actual patient alarms7 9 or to simulated alarms injected into real patient care environments13 may be better indicators of whether the entire alarm response system is functioning correctly. Larger, multisite studies are needed to assess patient outcomes.In addition to meaningful outcome measures, the second challenge for alarm QI projects is the lack of good evidence for alarm management interventions.

    Most alarm reduction interventions have not been systematically evaluated at all or low cost vaniqa only in small studies without a control group.10 11 As a result, alarm management projects tend to involve complex and costly bundles of interventions of uncertain benefit. The cost of these interventions is due in part to the growing industry of technology solutions for alarm management. Some institutions have also made massive investments in personnel, such as monitor ‘watchers’ to help nurses identify actionable alarms, for which there is also little evidence.14Future alarm management QI initiatives low cost vaniqa will benefit from a higher quality evidence base for the growing list of potential alarm management interventions. Pragmatic trials that leverage meaningful outcome measures to assess alarm interventions are warranted. In addition, we need to evaluate interventions that address the full spectrum of the alarm low cost vaniqa management system.

    Most alarm management interventions to date have focused primarily on filtering out non-actionable alarms. Far less emphasis has been placed on ensuring that the nurse receiving the notification is available to respond to the alarm, a prime opportunity for future work.Even if alarms are actionable, we know that nurses low cost vaniqa may not always respond quickly for a variety of reasons.7 15–17 Factors like insufficient staffing, high severity of illness on the unit and unbalanced nursing skill mix all likely contribute to inadequate alarm response. In critical care, nurses have reported that the nature of their work requires that they function as a team to respond to one another’s alarms.15 Although not ideal, nurses have developed heuristics based on factors like family presence at the bedside to help them prioritise alarm response in hectic work environments.7 16 Emphasising outcomes like faster alarm response time without addressing systems factors risks trading one patient safety problem for another. We do not want to engender more frequent interruptions of high-risk activities, like medication administration,18 19 because nurses feel compelled to respond more quickly to alarms.The robust QI initiative carried out by Pater et al reflects the type of thoughtful approach needed to implement and tailor alarm management interventions for a particular unit, demonstrating a generalisable low cost vaniqa process for others to emulate. Ultimately, every alarm offers a potential benefit (opportunity to rescue a patient) and comes with a potential cost (eg, increased alarm fatigue, interruptions of other activities).

    This trade-off needs to be optimised in the context of the individual unit, accounting for the unit-specific and systems factors that influence the cost of each additional alarm, including non-actionable alarm rates, unit layout, severity of illness and nurse staffing.17 20 With more robust outcome measures and more evidence to support interventions, we can increase the value of alarm QI initiatives and accelerate progress towards optimising alarm management systems.AcknowledgmentsWe thank Charles McCulloch, PhD (University of California, San Francisco) for comments on an early draft..

    Etchells E, Ho M, Shojania KG online doctor vaniqa. Value of small sample sizes in rapid-cycle quality improvement projects. BMJ Qual Safe online doctor vaniqa 2016;25:202–6.The article has been corrected since it was published online. The authors want to alert readers to the following error identified in the published version.

    The error is in the online doctor vaniqa last paragraph of the section “Small samples can make ‘rapid improvement’ Rapid”, wherein the minimum sample size has been considered as six instead of eight.For this first (convenience) sample of 10 volunteer users, 5/10 (50%) completed the form without any input or instructions. The other five became frustrated and gave up. Table 1 tells you that, with an observed success rate of 50% and a desired target of online doctor vaniqa 90%, any audit with a sample of six or more allows you to confidently reject the null hypothesis that your form is working at a 90% success rate.For decades, those working in hospitals normalised the incessant alarms from medical devices as a necessary, almost comforting, reality of a high tech industry. While nurses drowned in excessive, frequently uninformative alarms, other members of the healthcare team often paid little attention.

    Fortunately, times are changing and managing alarm fatigue is now a key patient safety priority in acute care environments.1Adverse patient events from alarm fatigue, particularly related to excessive physiological monitor alarms, have received widespread attention over the last decade, including from the news media.2–5 In online doctor vaniqa the USA, hospitals redoubled alarm safety efforts following the 2013 Joint Commission Sentinel Event Alert and subsequent National Patient Safety Goals on alarm safety.1 2 6 We are now beginning to understand how to reduce excessive non-actionable alarms (including invalid alarms as well as those that are valid but not actionable or informative),7 8 better manage alarm notifications and ultimately improve patient safety. Alarm data are readily available and measuring alarm response time during patient care is possible.7 9 Yet we have few high-quality reports describing clear improvement to clinical alarm burden, and most published interventions are of limited scope, duration or both.10 11 To demonstrate value in alarm quality improvement (QI) efforts moving forward, we need more rigorous evidence for interventions and more meaningful outcome measures.In this issue of BMJ Quality and Safety, Pater et al12 report the results of a comprehensive multidisciplinary alarm management QI project executed over 3½ years in a 17-bed paediatric acute care cardiology unit. The primary project goal was to online doctor vaniqa reduce alarm notifications from continuous bedside monitoring. Although limited to a single unit, the project is an important contribution to the scant literature on alarm management in paediatric settings for three reasons.

    First, the initiative lasted longer than most that have been reported, which allowed for tailoring of alarm interventions to the needs of the unit and patient population and measuring the impacts and sustainability over time. Second, the online doctor vaniqa scope of the intervention bundle encompassed a wide variety of changes including adoption of a smartphone notification system. Addition of time delays between when alarm thresholds are violated and when an alarm notification is issued. Implementation of an alarm notification escalation algorithm after a certain online doctor vaniqa amount of time in alarm threshold violation.

    Deactivation of numerous technical alarms (such as respiratory lead detachment). Monitoring of online doctor vaniqa electrode lead replacement every 24 hours. And discussion of alarm parameters on daily rounds. Third, the authors introduced a novel strategy for reducing the stress that alarms may cause patients and families by deactivating inroom alarm audio, although no outcomes were reported attributable directly to this component of the intervention.This project constitutes an important contribution to the published online doctor vaniqa literature.

    However, Pater et al faced two challenges that are ubiquitous in the field of clinical alarm management. (1) Identification of meaningful outcome measures and (2) Lack of high-quality evidence for online doctor vaniqa most interventions. With regards to the first challenge, the primary outcome measure used in the study comprised ‘initial alarm notifications’, defined as the first notification of a monitor alarm delivered to the nurse’s mobile device. Although initial alarm notifications declined by 68% following the intervention, these notifications accounted for only about half of all alarm notifications.

    The other half included second and third notifications for alarms exceeding specified delay thresholds, which were sent both to the mobile device of the primary nurse online doctor vaniqa and to ‘buddy’ nurses, potentially increasing alarm burden. On the other hand, eliminating inroom audible alarms may have reduced the perceived alarm burden for nurses compared with having both bedside and mobile device notifications. Determining the true benefit of a reduction in a subset of alarms presents complex challenges.Alarm frequency online doctor vaniqa is the most commonly used outcome measure in alarm research and QI projects, but reduction in alarms does not necessarily indicate improved patient safety or a highly functional alarm management system. Alarm reduction could easily be achieved in an undesirable way by simply turning off alarms.

    Unfortunately, most studies have not been powered online doctor vaniqa to statistically evaluate improvements in patient safety. (Pater et al did monitor patient safety balancing measures, which remained stable after intervention implementation). To assess change in nurses’ perceptions of alarm frequency, Pater et al conducted a prepost survey, which despite the small sample size (n=38 preintervention online doctor vaniqa and n=25 postintervention) managed to show improvement, with the percentage of nurses agreeing they could respond to alarms appropriately and quickly increasing from 32% to 76% (p<0.001). That said, this survey was not a validated measure of alarm fatigue.

    In fact, we currently online doctor vaniqa have no widely accepted, validated tool for assessing alarm fatigue.11As we look towards future evaluations of alarm management strategies, the focus needs to shift away from simply reducing the frequency of alarms to more meaningful outcome metrics. In addition to alarm rates, outcomes such as response time to actual patient alarms7 9 or to simulated alarms injected into real patient care environments13 may be better indicators of whether the entire alarm response system is functioning correctly. Larger, multisite studies are needed to assess patient outcomes.In addition to meaningful outcome measures, the second challenge for alarm QI projects is the lack of good evidence for alarm management interventions. Most alarm reduction interventions online doctor vaniqa have not been systematically evaluated at all or only in small studies without a control group.10 11 As a result, alarm management projects tend to involve complex and costly bundles of interventions of uncertain benefit.

    The cost of these interventions is due in part to the growing industry of technology solutions for alarm management. Some institutions have also made massive online doctor vaniqa investments in personnel, such as monitor ‘watchers’ to help nurses identify actionable alarms, for which there is also little evidence.14Future alarm management QI initiatives will benefit from a higher quality evidence base for the growing list of potential alarm management interventions. Pragmatic trials that leverage meaningful outcome measures to assess alarm interventions are warranted. In addition, we need online doctor vaniqa to evaluate interventions that address the full spectrum of the alarm management system.

    Most alarm management interventions to date have focused primarily on filtering out non-actionable alarms. Far less emphasis has been placed on ensuring that the nurse receiving the notification is available to respond to the alarm, a prime opportunity for future work.Even if alarms are actionable, we know that nurses may not always respond quickly for a variety of reasons.7 15–17 Factors like insufficient staffing, high severity of illness on online doctor vaniqa the unit and unbalanced nursing skill mix all likely contribute to inadequate alarm response. In critical care, nurses have reported that the nature of their work requires that they function as a team to respond to one another’s alarms.15 Although not ideal, nurses have developed heuristics based on factors like family presence at the bedside to help them prioritise alarm response in hectic work environments.7 16 Emphasising outcomes like faster alarm response time without addressing systems factors risks trading one patient safety problem for another. We do not want to engender more frequent interruptions of high-risk activities, online doctor vaniqa like medication administration,18 19 because nurses feel compelled to respond more quickly to alarms.The robust QI initiative carried out by Pater et al reflects the type of thoughtful approach needed to implement and tailor alarm management interventions for a particular unit, demonstrating a generalisable process for others to emulate.

    Ultimately, every alarm offers a potential benefit (opportunity to rescue a patient) and comes with a potential cost (eg, increased alarm fatigue, interruptions of other activities). This trade-off needs to be optimised in the context of the individual unit, accounting for the unit-specific and systems factors that influence the cost of each additional alarm, including non-actionable alarm rates, unit layout, severity of illness and nurse staffing.17 20 With more robust outcome measures and more evidence to support interventions, we can increase the value of alarm QI initiatives and accelerate progress towards optimising alarm management systems.AcknowledgmentsWe thank Charles McCulloch, PhD (University of California, San Francisco) for comments on an early draft..

    Vaniqa rebate form

    Brain & vaniqa rebate form. Spine Surgeons of New York offers treatments other than surgery to address patient concerns. In fact, BSSNY has vaniqa rebate form a whole practice dedicated to providing patients with pain relief without undergoing surgery.

    The practice, known as Spine Options, is located on the third floor of BSSNY’s main office in White Plains, N.Y. It is staffed by three board-certified physicians whose primary goal is to help patients with pain relief so they can live their best lives possible.BSSNY would like to announce the newest member of the Spine Options team, Dr. Neil Patel vaniqa rebate form.

    Dr. Patel is a double board-certified interventional pain management physician vaniqa rebate form. He provides comprehensive care for a wide variety of painful conditions of the spine, nerves, joints, and muscles by integrating interventional procedures, physical therapy, and medications.

    The various minimally invasive treatments Dr. Patel offers include fluoroscopic guided spine injections, peripheral vaniqa rebate form nerve blocks, regenerative medicine, and spinal cord stimulation. In addition, Dr.

    Patel has a particular interest in cancer pain, as well as the merging fields of neuromodulation and regenerative medicine. After earning vaniqa rebate form his medical degree, Dr. Patel performed his residency in physical medicine and rehabilitation at Mount Sinai Hospital in New York City.

    Dr. Patel then completed an interventional pain management fellowship at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center and then served as a pain management physician in the Department of Anesthesia and Critical Care Medicine at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center. Dr.

    Patel is currently the Medical Director of Pain Management and Palliative Care Medicine at Montefiore Nyack Hospital. He provides care to patients at BSSNY’s White Plains and Nyack offices. His goal is to provide targeted individualized treatment plans for his patients, with a focus on functional outcomes and quality of life.

    To learn more about Dr. Patel, please visit https://www.bssny.com/about/our-doctors/neil-patel-md/. Welcome to BSSNY and Spine Options Dr.

    Patel!. The Spine Options team at Brain &. Spine Surgeons of New York works hard to provide a custom plan for each patient that fits their exact needs for pain relief.

    If you would like to meet with one of our pain management physicians, please call 914-292-3367. Visit spineoptions.com for more information. BSSNY physicians are also now hosting FREE live webinars on their area of expertise—CME accredited.

    Please visit www.bssny.com for discussion topics and to register for the events.Daryl's House, a popular Hudson Valley music venue owned by Daryl Hall of Hall &. Oates, will halt in-person events for the foreseeable future due to COVID-19 related restrictions on ticketed, indoor live music imposed by Gov. Andrew Cuomo.The state's new ban prohibits ticketed comedy and music events at restaurants and bars, and only permits "incidental" music.

    According to the State Liquor Authority, this means that "music should be incidental to the dining experience and not the draw itself."The closure of Daryl's Place, located in Pawling, was announced on the venue's website on Friday, Aug. 28. "I am so sorry to say that Daryl's House is going to have to close temporarily due to the existing situation," wrote Hall.

    "We're gonna come back!. I hope to see everyone soon."Free live-streamed concerts taped inside the club, however, will still be shown on the venue's website. Viewers are encouraged to donate to the club via PayPal, and to supporting the #saveourstages initiative to procure federal funding for venues impacted by the pandemic by contacting their local legislators.Among upcoming live-streamed bands, all viewable on the venue's website at 9 p.m.

    Are Roomful of Blues on Saturday, Sept. 12, Sean Rowe on Friday, Sept. 18 and Eliot Lewis of Hall &.

    Oates on Thursday, Sept. 24. Click here to sign up for Daily Voice's free daily emails and news alerts..

    Brain & online doctor vaniqa. Spine Surgeons of New York offers treatments other than surgery to address patient concerns. In fact, BSSNY has a whole practice online doctor vaniqa dedicated to providing patients with pain relief without undergoing surgery.

    The practice, known as Spine Options, is located on the third floor of BSSNY’s main office in White Plains, N.Y. It is staffed by three board-certified physicians whose primary goal is to help patients with pain relief so they can live their best lives possible.BSSNY would like to announce the newest member of the Spine Options team, Dr. Neil Patel online doctor vaniqa.

    Dr. Patel is a double online doctor vaniqa board-certified interventional pain management physician. He provides comprehensive care for a wide variety of painful conditions of the spine, nerves, joints, and muscles by integrating interventional procedures, physical therapy, and medications.

    The various minimally invasive treatments Dr. Patel offers include fluoroscopic online doctor vaniqa guided spine injections, peripheral nerve blocks, regenerative medicine, and spinal cord stimulation. In addition, Dr.

    Patel has a particular interest in cancer pain, as well as the merging fields of neuromodulation and regenerative medicine. After earning online doctor vaniqa his medical degree, Dr. Patel performed his residency in physical medicine and rehabilitation at Mount Sinai Hospital in New York City.

    Dr. Patel then completed an interventional pain management fellowship at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center and then served as a pain management physician in the Department of Anesthesia and Critical Care Medicine at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center. Dr.

    Patel is currently the Medical Director of Pain Management and Palliative Care Medicine at Montefiore Nyack Hospital. He provides care to patients at BSSNY’s White Plains and Nyack offices. His goal is to provide targeted individualized treatment plans for his patients, with a focus on functional outcomes and quality of life.

    To learn more about Dr. Patel, please visit https://www.bssny.com/about/our-doctors/neil-patel-md/. Welcome to BSSNY and Spine Options Dr.

    Patel!. The Spine Options team at Brain &. Spine Surgeons of New York works hard to provide a custom plan for each patient that fits their exact needs for pain relief.

    If you would like to meet with one of our pain management physicians, please call 914-292-3367. Visit spineoptions.com for more information. BSSNY physicians are also now hosting FREE live webinars on their area of expertise—CME accredited.

    Please visit www.bssny.com for discussion topics and to register for the events.Daryl's House, a popular Hudson Valley music venue owned by Daryl Hall of Hall &. Oates, will halt in-person events for the foreseeable future due to COVID-19 related restrictions on ticketed, indoor live music imposed by Gov. Andrew Cuomo.The state's new ban prohibits ticketed comedy and music events at restaurants and bars, and only permits "incidental" music.

    According to the State Liquor Authority, this means that "music should be incidental to the dining experience and not the draw itself."The closure of Daryl's Place, located in Pawling, was announced on the venue's website on Friday, Aug. 28. "I am so sorry to say that Daryl's House is going to have to close temporarily due to the existing situation," wrote Hall.

    "We're gonna come back!. I hope to see everyone soon."Free live-streamed concerts taped inside the club, however, will still be shown on the venue's website. Viewers are encouraged to donate to the club via PayPal, and to supporting the #saveourstages initiative to procure federal funding for venues impacted by the pandemic by contacting their local legislators.Among upcoming live-streamed bands, all viewable on the venue's website at 9 p.m.

    Are Roomful of Blues on Saturday, Sept. 12, Sean Rowe on Friday, Sept. 18 and Eliot Lewis of Hall &.

    Oates on Thursday, Sept. 24. Click here to sign up for Daily Voice's free daily emails and news alerts..

    Cheapest vaniqa

    Minnesota marketplace highlights and updatesOpen enrollment for 2021 health cheapest vaniqa plans. November 1, 2020 cheapest vaniqa through December 22, 2020. Residents with qualifying events can still enroll or make changes to their 2020 coverage.Insurers implementing modest rate increases for 2021, after three straight years of average rate decreases. Quartz has joined the exchange for 2021, bringing total number of insurers to five.117,520 people enrolled for 2020, cheapest vaniqa a new record for MNsure.Insurer participation in MNsure. 2014 to 2021.Reinsurance program received federal approval, began operation in 2018.With reinsurance, rates decreased for 2018 and again, even more significantly, for 2019.

    But reinsurance also reduced funding for MinnesotaCare.The elimination of CSR funding further reduced MinnesotaCare funding, but this has been partly restored by a court ruling.MN provided premium relief for non-subsidy-eligible enrollees for 2017 only.Governor vetoed a proposed 2019 switch to HealthCare.gov.MNsure’s small business exchange no longer has any participating insurers.Minnesota health exchange overviewMinnesota’s one of the states fighting the hardest to preserve the cheapest vaniqa Affordable Care Act’s gains. See actions Minnesota has taken.Minnesota’s state-run exchange, MNsure, has five participating insurers for 2021, up from four in 2020. The exchange has cheapest vaniqa more than 117,000 individual market enrollees as of 2020.As a result of the COVID-19 pandemic, MNsure joined most of the other state-run exchanges in offering a special enrollment period during which people who were uninsured could enroll in a health plan. MNsure’s special enrollment period began March 23, and continued through April 21. Nearly 9,500 Minnesota residents enrolled in private plans through MNsure during this window, as well as another 13,700 who enrolled in MinnesotaCare or Medicaid (enrollment in those programs is open year-round for eligible residents).Allison O’Toole, who cheapest vaniqa led MNsure as CEO for three years, announced her resignation in March 2018, and the exchange named Nate Clark, the MNsure COO, as acting CEO.

    A few months later, the MNsure board named Clark as the permanent CEO. O’Toole left MNsure to work as director of state affairs for United States of Care, a non-profit cheapest vaniqa created by Andy Slavitt, who was the acting administrator of CMS under the Obama Administration.Throughout 2017, Minnesotans who bought their own health insurance (on or off-exchange) and weren’t eligible for ACA subsidies were provided with 25 percent premium rebates from the state as a result of S.F.1, signed into law by Governor Dayton in early 2017. The subsidies helped to offset the large premium increases that applied in Minnesota in 2017, and helped to stabilize the individual health insurance market in 2017. But the premium rebate program expired at the end of 2017.Thanks in large part to the new reinsurance program that Minnesota created (details below), premiums decreased in Minnesota’s individual market in 2018, 2019, and again cheapest vaniqa in 2020, although rates are increasing modestly for 2021. In May 2019, Minnesota leaders reached an agreement on a budget that included an extension of the reinsurance program through 2020 and 2021 (it has already been granted federal approval through the end of 2022, but the state has to continue to cover its share of the cost.

    Minnesota Governor Tim Walz had hoped to implement a premium subsidy program and a new tax cheapest vaniqa credit in Minnesota starting in 2020. But a compromise in the budget ended up with the state opting to continue the existing reinsurance program for two more years instead.).But the waiver that provides federal pass-through funding for reinsurance also resulted in a sharp and unexpected decrease in federal funding for MinnesotaCare, the Basic Health Program that provides coverage for people with income between 138 percent and 200 percent of the poverty level (between $16,642 and $24,120 for a single person).In addition, the elimination of federal funding for cost-sharing reductions (CSR) in October 2018 resulted in a funding cut for MinnesotaCare, since the program is funded in large part by federal funds that would otherwise have been used to pay for premium subsidies and cost-sharing reductions in the exchange for the population that is instead eligible for MinnesotaCare. After an ensuing legal battle, a judge cheapest vaniqa ordered HHS to restore funding for MinnesotaCare, although a resolution of the situation is ongoing, and the amount that HHS agreed to pay was still less than MinnesotaCare would have received if CSR funding had continued.Open enrollment for 2021 health plans extended through December 22, 2020. Insurers implementing modest rate increases for 2021, after three years of overall rate decreasesMNsure enabled window shopping for 2021 health plans as of October 12, 2020. This gives residents a few weeks to browse the available plans before open enrollment starts on cheapest vaniqa November 1, 2020.

    And MNsure has announced that open enrollment will continue through December 22, 2020. That’s a week longer than the open enrollment period cheapest vaniqa that will apply in states that use the federally-run exchange. The flexibility to extend open enrollment is often cited as one of the benefits of having a fully state-run exchange. (MNsure had a similar cheapest vaniqa extension last December, for 2020 health plans).For 2021, Quartz is joining the Minnesota marketplace. Quartz currently offers plans in Illinois and Wisconsin, and is expanding into Minnesota for 2021.

    And two of the existing insurers — HealthPartners and UCare — are expanding their coverage areas for 2021 (BluePlus cheapest vaniqa and Medica offer coverage statewide, and will continue to do so in 2021).The following average rate changes have been approved for MNsure’s insurers:Blue Plus. 4.21 percent increase (down from an initially proposed 7.12 percent increase)Group Health/Health cheapest vaniqa Partners (GHI). 0.67 percent increase (down from an initially proposed 4.15 percent increase)Medica. 2.42 percent increase (down from an cheapest vaniqa initially proposed 7.06 percent increase)UCare. 1.6 percent increase (up from an initially proposed 1.39 percent decrease)Quartz.

    New for 2021, so no applicable rate changePreferredOne Insurance Company, which offers plans cheapest vaniqa outside the exchange, is increasing premiums by 1.05 percent (down from an initially proposed average increase of 5.09 percent). Rate changes in previous years2015. Average increase cheapest vaniqa of 4.5 percent. MNsure critics characterized the official announcement as misleading as it failed to take into account low-cost 2014 plans from PreferredOne. Consumers who bought a PreferredOne plan through MNsure for 2014 could only renew their policies for 2015 by working directly with the insurer, since PreferredOne stopped offering plans in the exchange cheapest vaniqa at the end of 2014.

    However, PreferredOne rates went up an average of 63 percent, and consumers didn’t qualify for subsidies if they shopped outside the exchange. 2016. Average increase of 41.4 percent for the individual market, and about 38.5 for plans sold in MNsure (ie, not counting PreferredOne). Rates increased significantly in 2016 across the entire individual market in Minnesota — including plans sold through MNsure, the state-run exchange.Approved rates for 2016 were announced on October 1, 2015, ranging from about 15 percent for Medica to 49 percent for Blue Cross Blue Shield of Minnesota. In general, the carriers cited higher-than-expected claims costs over the past year, along with the impending phase-out of the ACA’s reinsurance program as justification for their 2016 rate requests.

    But Governor Mark Dayton called some of the higher proposed increases “outrageous,” and promised a rigorous review of the filed rate changes and justifications. Ultimately, regulators were able to limit the highest rate increases to 49 percent — as opposed to the 54 percent that had been requested by Blue Plus and BCBS of MN — but the final weighted average rate increase in the individual market in Minnesota still ended up being the highest in the nation. But Minnesota still had the lowest overall premiums in the upper midwest (although Minnesota had the highest average rate increase in the country for 2016, they had the lowest overall rates in the country in 2014 and 2015).Minnesota Commerce Commissioner Mike Rothman called the rate increases “unacceptably high,” and Gov. Dayton noted that he was “extremely unhappy” with the rate changes. But Rothman noted that his office “objected to all of the rates across the board,” and “squeezed out everything we could that was not actuarial justified.” In other words, the final rates, although much higher than officials and policyholders would have liked, were justified based on medical claims costs — the population enrolled in individual health plans in Minnesota was sicker than expected, and drug costs had been particularly onerous.Only about 55 percent of people who had 2015 coverage through MNsure received premium subsidies.

    But due to the sharp premium increases, that had increased to about 63 percent for the people who had purchased or renewed coverage as of June 2016.2017. When the Minnesota Department of Commerce announced health insurance rates for 2017 for the individual and small group markets, the rate hikes were somewhat reasonable in the small group market (ranging from a decrease of 1 percent to an increase of 17.8 percent), but the individual market was “experiencing serious disruptions in 2017” and “on the verge of collapse.” The four carriers that offered plans through MNsure had the following average rate increases in 2017:Blue Plus = 55 percentHealthPartners/Group Health (GHI) = 50 percent (HealthPartners is only offering plans in 10 of the 67 counties where they offered plans in 2016. Their enrollment cap is 72,000 for 2017)Medica = 57.5 percent (enrollment cap is 50,000 for 2017)UCare = 66.8 percent (UCare capped enrollment at 30,000 for 2017, but only had 16,000 enrollees in 2016)The enrollment caps that HealthPartners, Medica, and UCare employed for 2017 were approved as part of the rate review process, and are designed to protect carriers from further financial losses as they absorb BCBSMN’s enrollees who are shopping for new coverage during open enrollment.In a news release relating to the rate announcement for 2017, the Minnesota Department of Commerce didn’t mince words. They noted that the individual market in the state was on the brink of collapse, and that they did everything in their power to save the market. While they succeeded in keeping the state’s individual market viable for 2017, with only one carrier exiting (BCBSMN, although their HMO affiliate, Blue Plus, remained in the exchange), they reiterated very clearly that substantial reforms would be needed to keep the market stable in future years, and highlighted the fact that rates would be sharply higher and that carriers would limit enrollment in 2017.2018.

    Final rates for 2018 were approved in October 2017 (comprehensive information about the approved rates is here), based on the Minnesota Premium Security Plan (MSPS) being implemented but cost-sharing reductions (CSR) not being funded by the federal government (the cost of CSRs was added to on-exchange Silver plans). Average approved rate changes for MNsure insurers ranged from a 13.3 percent decrease for UCare to a 2.8 percent increase for Blue Plus. Three of the four MNsure insurers decreased their average premiums for 2018.On September 21, MNsure had posted a notice indicating that if the reinsurance program were not approved, rates would be about 20 percent higher than they would otherwise be in 2018. Fortunately for Minnesota residents, the reinsurance program did receive federal approval, and average rates declined slightly for 2018.But some enrollees who don’t get ACA premium subsidies still experienced a rate increase, due to the termination of the one-year, state-funded 25 percent premium rebates at the end of 2017.PreferredOne, which exited MNsure at the end of 2014 and only offers coverage in the off-exchange market, proposed dramatically lower rates for 2018. A 38 percent average decrease if MSPS were to be approved, and a 23 percent average decrease if not.

    The 38 percent decrease was implemented, and no adjustments were necessary to account for CSR funding, since PreferredOne does not offer plans in the exchange, and CSRs are only available on silver exchange plans.2019. Average premium decrease of 12.4 percent. Average premiums dropped for all five insurers in the individual market in 2019. This was the second year in a row of declining rates in Minnesota, but Blue Plus had a small rate increase for 2018, so 2019 was the first year that all five insurers decreased their average rates. Minnesota insurance regulators noted that rates in 2019 were about 20 percent lower than they would have been without the reinsurance program.But most of Minnesota’s insurers charged higher rates in 2019 than they would have if the individual mandate penalty hadn’t been eliminated, and if access to short-term plans and association health plans hadn’t been expanded by the Trump administration.

    For example, UCare’s rate filing notes that while average rates were decreasing by about 10 percent, the rate decrease would have been nearly 15 percent if the individual mandate penalty had remained in place.At ACA Signups, Charles Gaba calculated a weighted average rate decrease of 12.4 percent for 2019 in Minnesota, but noted that the average decrease would have been nearly 19 percent without those changes at the federal level.2020. Average premium decrease of 1 percent. Four of the five insurers (including PreferredOne, which only offers coverage off-exchange) in Minnesota’s individual market decreased their average premiums for 2020. This was the third year in a row that average individual market premiums dropped in Minnesota’s individual market, due in large part to the reinsurance program that the state has established.The following average rate changes were implemented for 2020:Blue Plus. 1.5 percent decrease (Blue Plus had originally proposed a 4.8 percent increase)Group Health/Health Partners (GHI).

    1.26 percent decrease (GHI had originally proposed a 2.1 percent increase)Medica. 1.01 percent decrease (Medica had originally proposed an average decrease of 1.4 percent)UCare. 0.18 percent increase (UCare originally proposed a 0.3 percent increase)PreferredOne, which only offers off-exchange coverage, reduced their rates by an average of 20 percent, on the heels of an 11 percent decrease in 2019. MNsure enrollment exceeded 116k in 2018, dropped to 113k for 2019, but grew to more than 1117k in 2020From 2014 through 2018, enrollment in MNsure’s individual market plans increased every year, reaching 116,358 people by 2018. That was the highest open enrollment total in MNsure’s history, despite the shorter enrollment period, which ended in mid-January instead of the end of January (open enrollment for 2018 coverage ended on December 15, 2017 in states that use HealthCare.gov, but MNsure opted to extend their enrollment window that year, and have also extended subsequent enrollment windows).Enrollment dropped for the first time in 2019, when 113,552 people enrolled in individual market plans through MNsure.

    In most states that use HealthCare.gov, enrollment peaked in 2016 and has been dropping since then. But MNsure’s drop-off in 2019, which amounted to only a 2.4 percent reduction in enrollment, is the only time year-over-year enrollment has declined. Notably, the ACA’s individual mandate penalty was eliminated as of 2019, and regulations that the Trump administration implemented in late 2018 now make it more feasible for healthy people to use short-term plans instead of ACA-compliant plans (Minnesota has its own rules for short-term plans, but they’re more relaxed than the Obama-era federal rules that applied in 2017 and most of 2018).And for 2020, enrollment grew again, reaching a record high of 117,520 enrollees.Here’s a look at the number of people who have signed up for individual market plans through MNsure during each year’s open enrollment period. These numbers all represent total enrollment at the end of open enrollment. Effectuated enrollment is always lower, and MNsure provides periodic effectuated enrollment data on their board meeting materials page.

    Insurer participation in MNsure. 2014-20212014. Five insurers offered individual policies through MNsure for 2014. Blue Cross Blue Shield of Minnesota, HealthPartners/Group Health, Medica, PreferredOne, and UCare. Kaiser Health News reported that Minnesota offered some of the lowest premiums for silver (mid-level) plans in the U.S.

    Four of Minnesota’s nine regions made Kaiser’s list of the 10 least expensive places to buy health insurance.2015. But PreferredOne, which offered the lowest rates in the nation in 2014 and captured a large portion of 2014 enrollees, withdrew from MNsure for 2015. PreferredOne said remaining on the exchange was “not administratively and financially sustainable.” A Star Tribune business writer attributed PreferredOne’s departure as a market dynamics issue rather than a problem with MNsure.However, Blue Plus (an affiliate of Blue Cross Blue Shield of MN, offering HMO plans) joined the exchange for 2015, so there were still five insurers offering plans for 2015. Blue Cross Blue Shield of Minnesota, Blue Plus, Health Partners/Group Health, Medica, and UCare. MNsure offered 84 plans statewide, up from 78 for 2014.2016.

    BCBSMN, Blue Plus, Health Partners/Group Health, Medica, and UCare offered individual market plans through MNsure for 2016.2017. In an effort to recruit more carriers to offer plans through MNsure for 2017 — particularly outside the Twin Cities metro area — state regulators sent out a request for proposals from health insurers on August 15, 2016. Regulators noted that insurers could propose waivers of regulations in order to make it feasible for them to offer coverage through MNsure, although any such waiver requests would have to be approved by regulators.Steven Parente, a health insurance expert at the University of Minnesota, called the state’s effort to recruit insurers to MNsure a “distress call” and noted that August 15 is awfully late in the year to be putting out a request for insurer participation, given that open enrollment begins November 1. And ultimately, no new insurers opted to join MNsure for 2017.Blue Cross Blue Shield of MN dropped their individual market PPO plans at the end of 2016 due to significant financial losses. That left Blue Plus (which offered HMOs and covered roughly 13,000 people in 2016 in the individual market) as the only BCBSMN affiliate in the exchange.

    Roughly 103,000 people had to select new plans during open enrollment.Most of those BCBSMN enrollees had off-exchange coverage, though. There were only about 20,400 MNsure enrollees (a little more than one in five MNsure enrollees) with coverage under BCBSMN who needed to switch to another plan during open enrollment. BCBSMN had individual PPO options available in all 87 counties in Minnesota through MNsure in 2016, while the Blue Plus coverage area — comprised of four separate HMO networks — was available in 77 of the state’s counties.Nationwide, carriers have been shifting away from PPOs and towards HMOs and EPOs. In Colorado, Anthem Blue Cross Blue Shield also dropped their PPOs at the end of 2016. In Indiana, there were no PPOs available in the individual market by 2017.

    Blue Cross Blue Shield of New Mexico dropped all of their individual market plans at the end of 2015 except one off-exchange HMO. Blue Cross Blue Shield of Texas dropped their individual market PPO plans at the end of 2015.The broad network offered by PPOs tends to be attractive to enrollees who have health problems. They’re often willing to pay higher premiums in trade for access to broad network of hospitals and specialists. But PPOs are expensive for carriers, as enrollees don’t need primary care referrals to see specialists, and it’s more challenging for carriers to hold down costs when there are more providers in the network.All of the MNsure carriers except Blue Plus are also limiting their total enrollment for 2017. By November 11, 2016, less than two weeks into open enrollment for 2017 coverage, Medica had hit their 50,000 member enrollment cap for 2017 (including on and off-exchange enrollments, and also accounting for expected renewals of 2016 Medica plans), and their policies were no longer available in the individual market in Minnesota, on or off-exchange.

    The only exception was five counties (Benton, Crow Wing, Mille Lacs, Morrison, and Stearns) where Medica agreed not to limit enrollment, as all of the other available carriers in those counties have imposed enrollment caps too. In those five counties, Medica plans continued to be available.At that point, Medica’s market share in MNsure for 2017 stood at 34.2 percent. By December 14, Medica’s market share had dropped to 27.7 percent, as enrollments had continued to climb for the remaining carriers.On January 31, Medica re-opened enrollment for 2017. This was because a smaller-than-expected number of 2016 Medica enrollees renewed their plans for 2017, meaning that the carrier still had some wiggle room under their 50,000 member cap. At that point, they had room for about 7,000 more enrollees.

    Medica plans were thus available throughout the duration of the special enrollment period that was added on at the end of open enrollment, and continue to be available for people with qualifying events.2018. Plans continued to be available from Blue Plus, Health Partners/Group Health (GHI), Medica, UCare. In the months before a decision was reached regarding an extension of the open enrollment window for 2018 plans (the first year that the federal government imposed a shorter, month-and-a-half enrollment window), two of MNsure’s participating insurers had differing positions. UCare believed the exchange should add an additional two-week special enrollment period, while Medica did not want the exchange to have the option to extend the newly-scheduled six-week enrollment window. Notably, Medica capped their enrollment very early during the 2017 open enrollment period, and while UCare also had an enrollment cap, it was set with a target of nearly doubling their 2016 enrollment.

    But Medica is the only MNsure insurer that didn’t set an enrollment cap for 2018.As was the case for 2017, enrollment caps were used in the individual market in Minnesota for 2018 by all insurers other than Medica (Medica did have an enrollment cap for 2017, which they hit very early in open enrollment. However, they resumed enrollments at the end of January 2017). Details about the insurers’ enrollment caps are in the plan binders in SERFF. For 2018, MNsure insurers implemented the following enrollment caps:Blue Plus. 55,000 member cap (aiming for a target of 50,000 effectuated enrollees, but effectuated enrollment is always lower than the number of people who initially enroll)Health Partners/Group Health (GHI).

    73,400 member cap (aiming for a target of 70,000 effectuated enrollees)Medica. No enrollment capUCare. 35,000 member cap (aiming for a target of 30,000 effectuated enrollees)MNsure confirmed in May 2018 that none of their insurers had hit their enrollment caps for 2018.Outside the exchange, PreferredOne had an enrollment cap of 3,000 members, although their 2017 membership was only about 300 people.2019 and 2020. Blue Plus, Health Partners/Group Health, UCare, and Medica have continued to offer plans through MNsure, and all of them continued to participate in 2020 as well. Blue Plus expanded to once again offer statewide coverage in 2020, for the first time since 2016.2021.

    Quartz joined the exchange for 2021, joining the four existing insurers. HealthPartners and UCare are both expanding their coverage areas for 2021.Minnesota Premium Security Plan. 1332 waiver proposal approved by CMS, but with a significant funding cut for MinnesotaCareIn May 2017, Minnesota Governor Mark Dayton submitted a 1332 waiver proposal to CMS. The 1332 waiver was based on H.F.5, which was enacted without Dayton’s signature in April 2017 (Dayton had proposed an alternative measure that would have allowed people in Minnesota to buy into MinnesotaCare. That measure was not able to pass the state’s Republican-dominated legislature).[For more than two decades, MinnesotaCare was a state program subsidizing health insurance for low-income residents.

    As of January 1, 2015, it transitioned to a Basic Health Program under the ACA, becoming the first BHP in the nation.]H.F.5 created the Minnesota Premium Security Plan (MPSP), which is a state-based reinsurance program (similar to the one the ACA implemented on a temporary basis through 2016, and that Alaska created for 2017. Several other states have since implemented reinsurance programs). The reinsurance program, which took effect in Minnesota in 2018, covers a portion of the claims that insurers face, resulting in lower total claims costs for the insurers, and thus lower premiums (average individual market premiums in Minnesota decreased from 2017 to 2018 as a result of the reinsurance program). The reinsurance kicks in once claims reach $50,000, and covers them at 80 percent up to $250,000 (this is similar to the coverage under the transitional reinsurance program that the ACA provided from 2014 through 2016).H.F.5 was contingent upon approval of the 1332 waiver, because it relies partially on federal funding, in addition to state funding. Under the federal approval that was granted in September 2017, the federal government is giving Minnesota the money that they save on premium tax credits, and that money is combined with state funds to implement the reinsurance program (lower premiums — as a result of the reinsurance program — result in the federal government having to pay a smaller total amount of premium tax credits, since the tax credits are smaller when premiums are smaller).It was expected that CMS would approve the state’s 1332 waiver proposal, and Governor Dayton requested that the approval process be swift so that the state could move forward with the implementation of the Minnesota Premium Security Plan in time for the 2018 plan year.

    Dayton indicated that his office had been told that approval would come in August 2017, but CMS didn’t approve the waiver until September 22. And the waiver approval letter noted that the federal savings for MinnesotaCare (the state’s Basic Health Program, or BHP) resulting from the reinsurance program would not be eligible to be passed along to the state — in other words, CMS would keep those savings instead.[Federal BHP funding is equal to 95 percent of the amount that the federal government would have otherwise spent on premium subsidies and cost-sharing reductions for the population that ends up being eligible for the BHP. So lower premiums — as a result of reinsurance — for qualified health plans in the exchange means that the amount the federal government would have had to spend on premium subsidies for that population is lower. That translates into a smaller amount of funding for the state’s BHP, according to the approach that HHS took for Minnesota’s waiver approval.]And based on the scathing letter that Dayton sent CMS a few days earlier, it appeared at that point that Minnesota could actually lose money on the deal — losing more in federal funding for MinnesotaCare than they gain in reinsurance funding. Dayton noted in his letter that the 1332 waiver approval process had been “nightmarish,” and that Minnesota went to great lengths to follow instructions from CMS at every turn, throughout the process of drafting H.F.5 and the 1332 waiver proposal.

    He explains that CMS provided Minnesota with explicit guidance in terms of how to draft the reinsurance program while maintaining full federal funding for MinnesotaCare, and highlighted the fact that the state never deviated from the instructions that were provided.The StarTribune editorial board called out then-Secretary of HHS, Tom Price and the Trump Administration for their lack of clarity on the issue, for apparently misleading the state during the 1332 waiver drafting process, and for effectively punishing the state of Minnesota for taking an innovative approach to ensuring that as many people as possible have health insurance.Insurers filed rates based on reinsurance being available. And by the time the waiver was approved, there was very little time to evaluate the potential impacts of the funding changes, as rates had to be finalized by October 2 in Minnesota. The finalized rates did incorporate the reinsurance program. The state has accepted the approved waiver, but Gov. Dayton sent a letter to HHS on October 3, asking them to reconsider the MinnesotaCare funding cuts, but the issue has remained unresolved.Elimination of CSR funding results in additional funding cut for MinnesotaCare, but a lawsuit has partially restored that fundingNationwide, 54 percent of exchange enrollees benefit from cost-sharing subsidies.

    But in Minnesota, only 13 percent of exchange enrollees are receiving cost-sharing subsidies. This is because of MinnesotaCare, which covers all enrollees with income up to 200 percent of the poverty level. That’s the same group that would otherwise benefit the most from cost-sharing subsidies, so the fact that MinnesotaCare is available means that most of the people who would otherwise be enrolled in cost-sharing subsidy plans are instead enrolled in MinnesotaCare.At first glance, this would appear to have made the uncertainty surrounding cost-sharing subsidy funding in 2017 a little less of a pressing issue in Minnesota than it was in many other states, since private insurers weren’t facing the sort of losses that insurers in other states were facing without federal funding for CSR. But when the Trump Administration eliminated federal funding for CSR in October 2017, HHS took the position tha t since CSR funding had been eliminated, the CSR portion of the federal funding for the BHPs in New York and Minnesota would be reduced to $0. This was not a cut-and-dried conclusion, however, as explained earlier in 2017 by Michael Kalina.In January 2018, the Attorneys General for New York and Minnesota filed a lawsuit against the US Department of Health and Human Services, seeking to restore funding for their Basic Health Programs.

    A judge ruled in favor of the states in May 2018, ensuring that MinnesotaCare would continue to receive at least some CSR-based funding. The amount awarded to the state for the first quarter of 2018 was just over half of what the state had initially expected in CSR-related funding, but a larger chuck of the funding was restored later in 2018. According to the Star Tribune, however, Minnesota still ended up losing $161 million in federal funding for MinnesotaCare due to the CSR funding cuts.In early 2019, the Trump administration proposed yet another funding cut (a third, after the cuts imposed by the reinsurance program and the elimination of CSR funding) as part of a new methodology for calculating BHP funding. This one was much smaller than the other two cuts, but taken together the funding reductions are pushing MinnesotaCare towards a looming budget shortfall. SHOP exchange.

    Down to one carrier as of 2016, zero by 2018 (and still zero in 2019)In 2015, there were two carriers in MNsure’s SHOP exchange for small businesses. Blue Cross Blue Shield of Minnesota, and Medica. But Medica announced in 2015 that they would exit the SHOP exchange in Minnesota, North Dakota, and Wisconsin at the end of the year. That left BCBS as the only small group carrier available through MNsure in 2016, but it didn’t change much from a practical standpoint, since 83 percent of MNsure’s small groups were enrolled in plans through BCBS in 2015. Indeed, Medica’s reason for exiting the small business exchange was based on low enrollment in the first two years.Blue Cross Blue Shield of Minnesota continued to be the only insurer offering SHOP coverage via MNsure in 2017, but announced in July 2017 that they would no longer offer SHOP coverage in 2018, and would instead transition their SHOP enrollees to small business coverage outside the exchange.

    At that point, there were only 3,287 people enrolled in SHOP coverage in Minnesota — far below the 155,000 people that were originally projected to have coverage through MNsure’s SHOP program by 2016 (this much lower-than-anticipated enrollment has been the case in nearly every state’s SHOP exchange. This situation is not unique to Minnesota). State law provided 25% premium rebate in 2017. Amendment to allow plans without essential benefits was cut from final legislationThroughout 2016, then-Governor Dayton called for a state-funded premium rebate for people who buy their own insurance but aren’t eligible for the ACA’s premium subsidies (those are only available for people with income up to 400 percent of the poverty level, or $100,400 for a family of four in 2019).Governor Dayton also noted that the government needed to act quickly to stabilize the individual market in Minnesota, and by late November 2016, his patience with lawmakers was wearing thin. In a November 23 press conference, Dayton said that House Republicans needed to “stop dilly-dallying” and decide whether to move forward with Dayton’s rebate proposal.Dayton had also indicated that he was considering calling a special session of the legislature after election day to address the situation, and that was being negotiated for December 20.

    But the talks fell through when Dayton and Republican House Speaker Kurt Daudt couldn’t agree on the three bills that would have been addressed in the special session. As a result, there was no special session.Instead, the issue was taken up by lawmakers as soon as the 2017 legislative session began. On January 5, Minnesota Senators Michelle Benson (R, 31st District) and Gary Dahms (R, 16th District) introduced S.F.1. The bill called for using $300 million in state funding to provide a 25 percent rebate to roughly 125,000 people in Minnesota.S.F.1 passed the Minnesota Senate by a 35-31 vote on January 12. Only one DFL Senator (Melisa Franzen, from Edina) voted with Republicans in favor of the legislation.

    It was then sent to the House, where an amendment was added that stripped out the requirement that health plans provide various mandated benefits (see “Journal of the Day” section “Top of page 154” in this version of the bill. Under the terms of the amendment, as long as a carrier offered at least one plan with all the mandated benefits, they would have been allowed to offer others without mandated benefits).The amended bill was sent back to the Senate on January 23. Differences between the bills that the two chambers passed had to be reconciled before being sent to Governor Dayton for his signature. By that point, the amendment to allow less-robust plans to be sold had garnered national attention, and public outrage helped to push lawmakers away from the provision. S.F.1 had also called for $150 million to be appropriated for fiscal year 2018 (through June 30, 2019) from the state general fund to a state-based reinsurance program to stabilize the individual market (Alaska did something similar in 2016, preventing a market collapse), but that provision was also removed in the final version (Minnesota did ultimately set up a reinsurance program, effective in 2018, which has served to stabilize the market and reduce premiums).A Conference Committee in the Senate recommended that the House “recede from its amendments” and the Conference Committee report passed the Senate on a 47-19 vote.

    The House passed the bill a few hours later, 108-19. It was sent to Governor Dayton, who immediately signed it into law. DFLers did have to compromise on one issue during the process. S.F.1 allows for-profit HMOs to begin operating in Minnesota’s individual market, which had long been limited to non-profit HMOs.Consumers were told to expect the premium rebates to show up by April 2017, but they were retroactively effective to January 2017. So a person who had been paying full price for a plan since January 2017 saw a substantial premium reduction on the April or May invoice.

    Going forward, for the remainder of the year, a 25 percent rebate applied each month.Since S.F.1 was signed into law with only a few days remaining in open enrollment (it ended January 31 that year), Governor Dayton and exchange officials were worried that there wouldn’t be enough time for people to learn about the rebate and apply for coverage before January 31. In December, Dayton had asked HHS to allow MNsure to extend its enrollment deadline to February 28 (instead of January 31) in order to allow lawmakers more time to work out the details of a state-based premium rebate while still allowing people to enroll after the legislative process is complete.HHS denied the request for a blanket extension, but MNsure used their own authority on January 28 to grant a one-week special enrollment period (February 1 to February 8) due to exceptional circumstances. Although the state-based 25 percent premium rebate was available on or off the exchange, the one-week extension was only valid through MNsure. Health insurers did not have to accept off-exchange enrollments without a qualifying event after January 31.The 25 percent premium rebate program in Minnesota was only authorized for one year, so the rebates did not continue into 2018. And although almost 100,000 people received premium relief through the program in 2017, it ended up costing less than the legislature had allocated, and about $100 million was returned to the state’s budget at the end of 2017.Protecting Medicaid enrollees from estate liensIn every state, Medicaid is jointly funded by the state and the federal government.

    Longstanding federal regulations, which predate the ACA, require states to “seek recovery of payments from the individual’s estate for nursing facility services, home and community-based services, and related hospital and prescription drug services” for any Medicaid enrollee over the age of 55. This applies essentially to long-term care services, but states also have the option to go after the individual’s estate to recover costs for other care that was provided by Medicaid after age 55.Prior to 2014, this wasn’t typically an issue, as Medicaid eligibility was generally restricted by asset tests or requirements that applicants be disabled or pregnant (although Minnesota did have much more generous Medicaid eligibility guidelines than most states prior to 2014). But as of 2014, in states that expanded Medicaid under the ACA, the only eligibility guideline is income. Applicants with income that doesn’t exceed 138 percent of the poverty level are directed to Medicaid, regardless of any assets they might have.When applicants use the health insurance exchange — MNsure in Minnesota — they’re automatically funneled into Medical Assistance (Medicaid) if their income is under 138 percent of the poverty level. But what these enrollees didn’t know was that the state also had a program in place to put liens on estates for Medicaid-provided services for people age 55 and older.The combination of these systems caught numerous residents off guard.

    They were enrolled in Medical Assistance through MNsure based on their income, but were not aware that liens were being placed on their homes so that the state could recoup the costs upon their deaths.State Senator Tony Lourey (DFL, District 11) addressed the issue with language included in HF2749, the Omnibus supplemental budget bill, which was signed into law by Governor Dayton on June 1, 2016. The legislation limits estate recovery to just what’s required under federal Medicaid rules (ie, essentially, long-term care costs for people age 55 or older), and makes the provision retroactive to January 1, 2014.Early tech strugglesMNsure opened for business in the fall of 2013, but technological issues persisted well into 2015, despite numerous improvements throughout 2014. Given MNsure’s difficult launch, the state conducted a series of audits and reviews. The first audit reviewed how MNsure spent state and federal money. Auditors concluded that the exchange has generally adequate internal controls and found no fraud or abuse.

    The review was conducted by the state Office of the Legislative Auditor, and the report was published in October 2014.Another audit, also conducted by the Office of the Legislative Auditor and released in November 2014, found that the MNsure system in some cases incorrectly determined who qualified for public health benefits. The errors occurred during the first open enrollment period, before a series of system fixes were implemented. The audit did not quantify the total financial impact of the errors. The state Human Services commissioner said a consultant working on technical fixes to MNsure concluded that the eligibility functionality was working correctly as of June 2014.A third audit, a performance evaluation report released in February 2015, said “MNsure’s failures outweighed its achievements.” Among other criticisms, auditors said MNsure staff withheld information from the board of directors and state officials, the enrollment website was seriously flawed and launched without adequate testing, and the first-year enrollment target was unrealistically low.In April 2014, MNsure hired Deloitte Consulting to audit MNsure’s technology and improve the website to make enrolling in coverage and updating life events easier and more streamlined. Deloitte has been involved in successful state-run marketplaces for Connecticut, Kentucky, Rhode Island and Washington.Software upgrades were installed in August 2014, and system testing continued right up until the start of open enrollment.

    To reduce wait times for consumers and insurance professionals, MNsure increased its call center and support staff and launched a dedicated service line for agents and brokers.More in-person assisters were available in Minnesota for the 2015 open enrollment period. MNsure encourages residents to utilize the exchange’s assister directory to find local navigators and brokers who can help with the enrollment process.MNsure has improved dramatically in terms of its technology since the early days of ACA implementation, and enrollment increased every year from 2014 through 2019.Lawmakers approved switching to HealthCare.gov as of 2019, but governor vetoedOn May 9, 2017, lawmakers in Minnesota passed SF800, an omnibus health and human services bill. Among many other things, the legislation called for switching from MNsure to the federally-run marketplace (HealthCare.gov) starting in 2019 (see Section 5). But Governor Dayton vetoed it.Gov. Dayton has long been supportive of MNsure, and had previously clarified that he would veto the bill.

    In noting his plans to veto the legislation, Dayton made no mention of the transition to HealthCare.gov that was included in the legislation, but focused instead on the sharp budget cuts in the bill. But his veto ensured that MNsure would remain in place, at least for the time being.The Senate’s original version of SF800 did not call for scrapping MNsure, but the bill went through considerable back-and-forth between the two chambers, and the version that passed was the 4th engrossment of the bill.In March 2015, Dayton had asked the legislature to create a Task Force on Health Care Financing that would study MNsure along with possible future alternatives. Dayton noted in his letter that he supported making MNsure “directly accountable to the governor and subject to the same legislative oversight as other state agencies” and his budget included half a million dollars devoted to the task force. The spending bill was approved by the legislature in May, and the 29-member task force was appointed in the summer.One of the possibilities that the task force considered was the possibility of switching to Healthcare.gov, but it’s clear that there was no cut-and-dried answer to the question of whether Minnesota is better served by having a state-run exchange, switching to a federally-run exchange, or teaming up with the federal government on either a supported state-based marketplace or partnership exchange.In a December 2015 meeting of the task force, the MN Department of Human Services presented a financial analysis of the alternatives available to MNsure. They determined that switching entirely to Healthcare.gov would cost the state an additional $5.1 million in one-time costs from June 2016 to June 2017.

    And switching to a supported state-based marketplace would cost an additional $6.6 million during that same time frame. If the state had opted to switch to Healthcare.gov, the soonest it could have happened was 2018, since HHS requires a year’s notice from states wishing to transition to Healthcare.gov, and Minnesota wouldn’t have been in a position to make a decision until sometime in 2016.There were significant reservations about making that switch prior to the Supreme Court’s ruling on King v. Burwell. The Court ruled in June 2015 that subsidies are legal in every state, including those that use Healthcare.gov. Prior to the decision, a switch to Healthcare.gov could have jeopardized subsidies for tens of thousands of Minnesota residents.

    But once it was clear that Healthcare.gov’s subsidies are safe, some stakeholders began calling for Minnesota to scrap its state-run exchange and use Healthcare.gov instead. Because the MNsure task force was included in the 2016 budget, no hasty decisions were made.In January 2016, the task force submitted their recommendations to the legislature. They covered a broad range of issues, but did not recommend that MNsure transition to the federal enrollment platform. Lawmakers essentially left the exchange alone during the 2016 legislative session.The magnitude of the 2016 rate increases that were announced in October resulted in MNsure opponents renewing their calls to switch to Healthcare.gov. But it’s important to keep in mind that the 41 percent weighted average rate hike in Minnesota was market-wide, and did not just apply to MNsure enrollees.

    In fact, the off-exchange carrier (PreferredOne) had among the highest rate hikes in the state for 2016, at 39 percent, and the exchange’s weighted average rate increase (38.5 percent) was lower than the weighted average rate increase for the whole individual market (41 percent).Minnesota health insurance exchange linksMNsure855-3MNSURE (855-366-7873)State Exchange Profile. MinnesotaThe Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation overview of Minnesota’s progress toward creating a state health insurance exchange.Louise Norris is an individual health insurance broker who has been writing about health insurance and health reform since 2006. She has written dozens of opinions and educational pieces about the Affordable Care Act for healthinsurance.org. Her state health exchange updates are regularly cited by media who cover health reform and by other health insurance experts.Key takeaways Medicaid expansion in HawaiiHawaii adopted Medicaid expansion through the Affordable Care Act, extending eligibility for Medicaid to adults with income up to 133 percent of the poverty level (138 percent with the automatic 5 percent income disregard).

    Medicaid expansion took effect in January 2014.According to the Kaiser Family Foundation, about 70,000 Hawaii residents were uninsured in 2015. With Medicaid expansion now covering low-income, nonelderly adults, 50 percent of Hawaii’s remaining uninsured population at that point was eligible for Medicaid – although they may not realize that they’re eligible. According to U.S. Census data, only 3.5 percent of Hawaii residents were uninsured as of 2016, down from 6.7 percent in 2013. Although the state’s uninsured rate was reduced by nearly half from 2013 to 2016, it was already less than half of the national average uninsured rate even in 2013, before the bulk of the ACA’s provisions had taken effect.

    Hawaii’s Prepaid Health Care Act, which has been in place since the 1970s, had already resulted in nearly all of the state’s population having insurance coverage, even before the ACA took effect. However, with the coronavirus outbreak, job losses and the subsequent loss of employer-provided insurance have contributed to a jump in the uninsured rate across the U.S. As of May 2020, Hawaii’s uninsured rate was 10 percent.Medicaid expansion helped cement top-ranking health scores Federalpoverty levelcalculator 0.0% of Federal Poverty Level Hawaii has a long history of supporting initiatives to make health insurance broadly available to residents. Hawaii was among the first six states that implemented a Medicaid program in January 1966, just six months after federal legislation authorizing the program was enacted. In 1974, Hawaii implemented its Prepaid Health Care Act, which mandated that most employers make health insurance available to employees who work at least 20 hours a week.In conjunction with the Affordable Care Act (ACA), Hawaii initially implemented a state-run health insurance marketplace and adopted Medicaid expansion.

    The marketplace transitioned to a federally-supported state-run marketplace for 2016, and transitioned again to a fully federally-run exchange for 2017, largely in an effort to take advantage of the economies of scale that the federally-run exchange could bring to a state with low overall enrollment in the individual market (because of Hawaii’s Prepaid Health Care Act, nearly all non-elderly Hawaii residents get coverage from an employer, and relatively few need coverage under individual market plans). Nothing changed about Medicaid with the switch to Healthcare.gov though. The expanded Medicaid eligibility guidelines are still in effect in Hawaii.Through its efforts, Hawaii consistently has low uninsured rates and high overall health scores. As of 2015, Hawaii was ranked the healthiest state in the nation according to the Gallup Healthways Physical Wellbeing Index, and the state consistently scores near the top in other ranking systems (number 2 the America’s Health Rankings 2017 survey, and number 3 in the Commonwealth Fund’s 2017 Scorecard on State Health System Performance).Who is eligible for Medicaid in Hawaii?. Hawaii’s Medicaid eligibility levels for children are much higher than the national average and about average for pregnant women and parents.Children ages 0-18 qualify with family income levels up to 308 of the federal poverty level (FPL)Pregnant women qualify with family income up to 191 percent of FPLParents and other adults qualify with family income up to 138 percent of FPLHawaii also uses Medicaid funds to help cover premium costs for Hawaii residents who aren’t U.S.

    Citizens but who are citizens of nations that have entered into the Compact of Free Association (COFA) with the U.S.How do I enroll in Medicaid in Hawaii?. Hawaii’s Medicaid program is called MED-QUEST (MQD). QUEST stands for Quality care, Universal access, Efficient utilization, Stabilizing costs, and Transforming the way health care is provided to recipients.You can apply for MED-QUEST. Hawaii Medicaid enrollment numbersMore than 351,000 people were enrolled in Hawaii’s Medicaid and CHIP programs as of June 2020. This figure is a 22% increase over 2013 (pre-ACA) enrollment, when about 288,000 people were enrolled.

    Accordingly to the Kaiser Family Foundation, 107,300 of those enrolled in Hawaii Medicaid are part of the ACA-authorized expansion as of June 2019.Hawaii Medicaid historyHawaii implemented its Medicaid program in January 1966.In the early 1990s, Hawaii implemented the State Health Insurance Program (SHIP) to cover people who weren’t eligible for Medicaid. Then, in 1994, CMS approved Hawaii’s section 1115 Medicaid waiver (one of the first in the nation) to wrap SHIP in with Medicaid in an effort to achieve universal insurance coverage (in combination with the state’s Prepaid Health Care Act). The result of the waiver was the creation of Hawaii’s MED-QUEST program, which initially covered low-income women and children, but has since expanded (as of 2009) to cover nearly all of Hawaii’s Medicaid beneficiaries. The MED-QUEST waiver is subject to renewal every five years.Medicaid in Hawaii is separated into two different methods of providing services. The fee-for-service (FFS) program and the managed care program, called MED-QUEST or MQD.

    Under the FFS program, doctors and other healthcare providers bill Medicaid directly to be reimbursed for services provided to Medicaid beneficiaries. Under MED-QUEST, the state contracts with managed care plans who in turn provide healthcare services to Medicaid beneficiaries.As of 2011, more than 98 percent of the people enrolled in Hawaii’s Medicaid program were covered through managed care. By March 2015, Kaiser Family Foundation reported that 335,007 Medicaid enrollees in Hawaii were covered under managed care programs. That’s higher than the August 2015 total Medicaid/CHIP enrollment count, but KFF notes that the managed care number includes people who are covered under Hawaii’s fully-state-funded Medicaid program, in addition to the majority of enrollees who are in regular Medicaid that’s funded partially by the state and partially by the federal government.In August 2017, Hawaii submitted a waiver amendment to CMS in order to gain federal approval to use Medicaid funding to provide housing services to qualified Medicaid enrollees who are homeless and also have behavioral health and/or substance abuse problems. That waiver request was still pending as of February 2018.Louise Norris is an individual health insurance broker who has been writing about health insurance and health reform since 2006.

    She has written dozens of opinions and educational pieces about the Affordable Care Act for healthinsurance.org. Her state health exchange updates are regularly cited by media who cover health reform and by other health insurance experts..

    Minnesota marketplace highlights online doctor vaniqa and updatesOpen enrollment for 2021 health plans. November 1, 2020 through December online doctor vaniqa 22, 2020. Residents with qualifying events can still enroll or make changes to their 2020 coverage.Insurers implementing modest rate increases for 2021, after three straight years of average rate decreases. Quartz has joined the exchange for 2021, bringing total number of online doctor vaniqa insurers to five.117,520 people enrolled for 2020, a new record for MNsure.Insurer participation in MNsure. 2014 to 2021.Reinsurance program received federal approval, began operation in 2018.With reinsurance, rates decreased for 2018 and again, even more significantly, for 2019.

    But reinsurance also reduced funding for MinnesotaCare.The elimination of CSR funding further reduced MinnesotaCare funding, but this has been partly restored by a court ruling.MN provided premium relief online doctor vaniqa for non-subsidy-eligible enrollees for 2017 only.Governor vetoed a proposed 2019 switch to HealthCare.gov.MNsure’s small business exchange no longer has any participating insurers.Minnesota health exchange overviewMinnesota’s one of the states fighting the hardest to preserve the Affordable Care Act’s gains. See actions Minnesota has taken.Minnesota’s state-run exchange, MNsure, has five participating insurers for 2021, up from four in 2020. The exchange has more than 117,000 individual market enrollees as of 2020.As a result of the COVID-19 pandemic, MNsure online doctor vaniqa joined most of the other state-run exchanges in offering a special enrollment period during which people who were uninsured could enroll in a health plan. MNsure’s special enrollment period began March 23, and continued through April 21. Nearly 9,500 Minnesota residents enrolled in private plans through MNsure during this window, as well as another 13,700 who enrolled in MinnesotaCare or Medicaid (enrollment in those programs is open year-round for eligible residents).Allison O’Toole, who led MNsure as CEO for three online doctor vaniqa years, announced her resignation in March 2018, and the exchange named Nate Clark, the MNsure COO, as acting CEO.

    A few months later, the MNsure board named Clark as the permanent CEO. O’Toole left MNsure to work as director of state affairs for United States of Care, a non-profit created by Andy Slavitt, who was the acting administrator of CMS under the Obama Administration.Throughout 2017, Minnesotans who bought their own health insurance (on or off-exchange) and weren’t eligible for ACA subsidies were provided with 25 percent premium rebates from the state as a result online doctor vaniqa of S.F.1, signed into law by Governor Dayton in early 2017. The subsidies helped to offset the large premium increases that applied in Minnesota in 2017, and helped to stabilize the individual health insurance market in 2017. But the premium rebate program expired at the end of 2017.Thanks in large part to online doctor vaniqa the new reinsurance program that Minnesota created (details below), premiums decreased in Minnesota’s individual market in 2018, 2019, and again in 2020, although rates are increasing modestly for 2021. In May 2019, Minnesota leaders reached an agreement on a budget that included an extension of the reinsurance program through 2020 and 2021 (it has already been granted federal approval through the end of 2022, but the state has to continue to cover its share of the cost.

    Minnesota Governor Tim Walz had online doctor vaniqa hoped to implement a premium subsidy program and a new tax credit in Minnesota starting in 2020. But a compromise in the budget ended up with the state opting to continue the existing reinsurance program for two more years instead.).But the waiver that provides federal pass-through funding for reinsurance also resulted in a sharp and unexpected decrease in federal funding for MinnesotaCare, the Basic Health Program that provides coverage for people with income between 138 percent and 200 percent of the poverty level (between $16,642 and $24,120 for a single person).In addition, the elimination of federal funding for cost-sharing reductions (CSR) in October 2018 resulted in a funding cut for MinnesotaCare, since the program is funded in large part by federal funds that would otherwise have been used to pay for premium subsidies and cost-sharing reductions in the exchange for the population that is instead eligible for MinnesotaCare. After an ensuing legal battle, a judge ordered HHS to restore funding for MinnesotaCare, although a resolution of the situation is ongoing, and the amount that HHS agreed to pay was still less than MinnesotaCare would have received online doctor vaniqa if CSR funding had continued.Open enrollment for 2021 health plans extended through December 22, 2020. Insurers implementing modest rate increases for 2021, after three years of overall rate decreasesMNsure enabled window shopping for 2021 health plans as of October 12, 2020. This gives residents a few online doctor vaniqa weeks to browse the available plans before open enrollment starts on November 1, 2020.

    And MNsure has announced that open enrollment will continue through December 22, 2020. That’s a week longer than the online doctor vaniqa open enrollment period that will apply in states that use the federally-run exchange. The flexibility to extend open enrollment is often cited as one of the benefits of having a fully state-run exchange. (MNsure had a similar extension last December, for 2020 health plans).For 2021, online doctor vaniqa Quartz is joining the Minnesota marketplace. Quartz currently offers plans in Illinois and Wisconsin, and is expanding into Minnesota for 2021.

    And two of the existing insurers — HealthPartners and UCare — are expanding their coverage areas for 2021 (BluePlus and Medica offer coverage statewide, and will continue to do so in 2021).The following average rate changes have been approved for MNsure’s online doctor vaniqa insurers:Blue Plus. 4.21 percent increase (down from an initially proposed 7.12 percent increase)Group online doctor vaniqa Health/Health Partners (GHI). 0.67 percent increase (down from an initially proposed 4.15 percent increase)Medica. 2.42 percent online doctor vaniqa increase (down from an initially proposed 7.06 percent increase)UCare. 1.6 percent increase (up from an initially proposed 1.39 percent decrease)Quartz.

    New for 2021, so no applicable rate changePreferredOne Insurance Company, which offers plans outside the exchange, is increasing online doctor vaniqa premiums by 1.05 percent (down from an initially proposed average increase of 5.09 percent). Rate changes in previous years2015. Average increase of 4.5 online doctor vaniqa percent. MNsure critics characterized the official announcement as misleading as it failed to take into account low-cost 2014 plans from PreferredOne. Consumers who bought a PreferredOne plan through MNsure for 2014 could only renew their policies for 2015 online doctor vaniqa by working directly with the insurer, since PreferredOne stopped offering plans in the exchange at the end of 2014.

    However, PreferredOne rates went up an average of 63 percent, and consumers didn’t qualify for subsidies if they shopped outside the exchange. 2016. Average increase of 41.4 percent for the individual market, and about 38.5 for plans sold in MNsure (ie, not counting PreferredOne). Rates increased significantly in 2016 across the entire individual market in Minnesota — including plans sold through MNsure, the state-run exchange.Approved rates for 2016 were announced on October 1, 2015, ranging from about 15 percent for Medica to 49 percent for Blue Cross Blue Shield of Minnesota. In general, the carriers cited higher-than-expected claims costs over the past year, along with the impending phase-out of the ACA’s reinsurance program as justification for their 2016 rate requests.

    But Governor Mark Dayton called some of the higher proposed increases “outrageous,” and promised a rigorous review of the filed rate changes and justifications. Ultimately, regulators were able to limit the highest rate increases to 49 percent — as opposed to the 54 percent that had been requested by Blue Plus and BCBS of MN — but the final weighted average rate increase in the individual market in Minnesota still ended up being the highest in the nation. But Minnesota still had the lowest overall premiums in the upper midwest (although Minnesota had the highest average rate increase in the country for 2016, they had the lowest overall rates in the country in 2014 and 2015).Minnesota Commerce Commissioner Mike Rothman called the rate increases “unacceptably high,” and Gov. Dayton noted that he was “extremely unhappy” with the rate changes. But Rothman noted that his office “objected to all of the rates across the board,” and “squeezed out everything we could that was not actuarial justified.” In other words, the final rates, although much higher than officials and policyholders would have liked, were justified based on medical claims costs — the population enrolled in individual health plans in Minnesota was sicker than expected, and drug costs had been particularly onerous.Only about 55 percent of people who had 2015 coverage through MNsure received premium subsidies.

    But due to the sharp premium increases, that had increased to about 63 percent for the people who had purchased or renewed coverage as of June 2016.2017. When the Minnesota Department of Commerce announced health insurance rates for 2017 for the individual and small group markets, the rate hikes were somewhat reasonable in the small group market (ranging from a decrease of 1 percent to an increase of 17.8 percent), but the individual market was “experiencing serious disruptions in 2017” and “on the verge of collapse.” The four carriers that offered plans through MNsure had the following average rate increases in 2017:Blue Plus = 55 percentHealthPartners/Group Health (GHI) = 50 percent (HealthPartners is only offering plans in 10 of the 67 counties where they offered plans in 2016. Their enrollment cap is 72,000 for 2017)Medica = 57.5 percent (enrollment cap is 50,000 for 2017)UCare = 66.8 percent (UCare capped enrollment at 30,000 for 2017, but only had 16,000 enrollees in 2016)The enrollment caps that HealthPartners, Medica, and UCare employed for 2017 were approved as part of the rate review process, and are designed to protect carriers from further financial losses as they absorb BCBSMN’s enrollees who are shopping for new coverage during open enrollment.In a news release relating to the rate announcement for 2017, the Minnesota Department of Commerce didn’t mince words. They noted that the individual market in the state was on the brink of collapse, and that they did everything in their power to save the market. While they succeeded in keeping the state’s individual market viable for 2017, with only one carrier exiting (BCBSMN, although their HMO affiliate, Blue Plus, remained in the exchange), they reiterated very clearly that substantial reforms would be needed to keep the market stable in future years, and highlighted the fact that rates would be sharply higher and that carriers would limit enrollment in 2017.2018.

    Final rates for 2018 were approved in October 2017 (comprehensive information about the approved rates is here), based on the Minnesota Premium Security Plan (MSPS) being implemented but cost-sharing reductions (CSR) not being funded by the federal government (the cost of CSRs was added to on-exchange Silver plans). Average approved rate changes for MNsure insurers ranged from a 13.3 percent decrease for UCare to a 2.8 percent increase for Blue Plus. Three of the four MNsure insurers decreased their average premiums for 2018.On September 21, MNsure had posted a notice indicating that if the reinsurance program were not approved, rates would be about 20 percent higher than they would otherwise be in 2018. Fortunately for Minnesota residents, the reinsurance program did receive federal approval, and average rates declined slightly for 2018.But some enrollees who don’t get ACA premium subsidies still experienced a rate increase, due to the termination of the one-year, state-funded 25 percent premium rebates at the end of 2017.PreferredOne, which exited MNsure at the end of 2014 and only offers coverage in the off-exchange market, proposed dramatically lower rates for 2018. A 38 percent average decrease if MSPS were to be approved, and a 23 percent average decrease if not.

    The 38 percent decrease was implemented, and no adjustments were necessary to account for CSR funding, since PreferredOne does not offer plans in the exchange, and CSRs are only available on silver exchange plans.2019. Average premium decrease of 12.4 percent. Average premiums dropped for all five insurers in the individual market in 2019. This was the second year in a row of declining rates in Minnesota, but Blue Plus had a small rate increase for 2018, so 2019 was the first year that all five insurers decreased their average rates. Minnesota insurance regulators noted that rates in 2019 were about 20 percent lower than they would have been without the reinsurance program.But most of Minnesota’s insurers charged higher rates in 2019 than they would have if the individual mandate penalty hadn’t been eliminated, and if access to short-term plans and association health plans hadn’t been expanded by the Trump administration.

    For example, UCare’s rate filing notes that while average rates were decreasing by about 10 percent, the rate decrease would have been nearly 15 percent if the individual mandate penalty had remained in place.At ACA Signups, Charles Gaba calculated a weighted average rate decrease of 12.4 percent for 2019 in Minnesota, but noted that the average decrease would have been nearly 19 percent without those changes at the federal level.2020. Average premium decrease of 1 percent. Four of the five insurers (including PreferredOne, which only offers coverage off-exchange) in Minnesota’s individual market decreased their average premiums for 2020. This was the third year in a row that average individual market premiums dropped in Minnesota’s individual market, due in large part to the reinsurance program that the state has established.The following average rate changes were implemented for 2020:Blue Plus. 1.5 percent decrease (Blue Plus had originally proposed a 4.8 percent increase)Group Health/Health Partners (GHI).

    1.26 percent decrease (GHI had originally proposed a 2.1 percent increase)Medica. 1.01 percent decrease (Medica had originally proposed an average decrease of 1.4 percent)UCare. 0.18 percent increase (UCare originally proposed a 0.3 percent increase)PreferredOne, which only offers off-exchange coverage, reduced their rates by an average of 20 percent, on the heels of an 11 percent decrease in 2019. MNsure enrollment exceeded 116k in 2018, dropped to 113k for 2019, but grew to more than 1117k in 2020From 2014 through 2018, enrollment in MNsure’s individual market plans increased every year, reaching 116,358 people by 2018. That was the highest open enrollment total in MNsure’s history, despite the shorter enrollment period, which ended in mid-January instead of the end of January (open enrollment for 2018 coverage ended on December 15, 2017 in states that use HealthCare.gov, but MNsure opted to extend their enrollment window that year, and have also extended subsequent enrollment windows).Enrollment dropped for the first time in 2019, when 113,552 people enrolled in individual market plans through MNsure.

    In most states that use HealthCare.gov, enrollment peaked in 2016 and has been dropping since then. But MNsure’s drop-off in 2019, which amounted to only a 2.4 percent reduction in enrollment, is the only time year-over-year enrollment has declined. Notably, the ACA’s individual mandate penalty was eliminated as of 2019, and regulations that the Trump administration implemented in late 2018 now make it more feasible for healthy people to use short-term plans instead of ACA-compliant plans (Minnesota has its own rules for short-term plans, but they’re more relaxed than the Obama-era federal rules that applied in 2017 and most of 2018).And for 2020, enrollment grew again, reaching a record high of 117,520 enrollees.Here’s a look at the number of people who have signed up for individual market plans through MNsure during each year’s open enrollment period. These numbers all represent total enrollment at the end of open enrollment. Effectuated enrollment is always lower, and MNsure provides periodic effectuated enrollment data on their board meeting materials page.

    Insurer participation in MNsure. 2014-20212014. Five insurers offered individual policies through MNsure for 2014. Blue Cross Blue Shield of Minnesota, HealthPartners/Group Health, Medica, PreferredOne, and UCare. Kaiser Health News reported that Minnesota offered some of the lowest premiums for silver (mid-level) plans in the U.S.

    Four of Minnesota’s nine regions made Kaiser’s list of the 10 least expensive places to buy health insurance.2015. But PreferredOne, which offered the lowest rates in the nation in 2014 and captured a large portion of 2014 enrollees, withdrew from MNsure for 2015. PreferredOne said remaining on the exchange was “not administratively and financially sustainable.” A Star Tribune business writer attributed PreferredOne’s departure as a market dynamics issue rather than a problem with MNsure.However, Blue Plus (an affiliate of Blue Cross Blue Shield of MN, offering HMO plans) joined the exchange for 2015, so there were still five insurers offering plans for 2015. Blue Cross Blue Shield of Minnesota, Blue Plus, Health Partners/Group Health, Medica, and UCare. MNsure offered 84 plans statewide, up from 78 for 2014.2016.

    BCBSMN, Blue Plus, Health Partners/Group Health, Medica, and UCare offered individual market plans through MNsure for 2016.2017. In an effort to recruit more carriers to offer plans through MNsure for 2017 — particularly outside the Twin Cities metro area — state regulators sent out a request for proposals from health insurers on August 15, 2016. Regulators noted that insurers could propose waivers of regulations in order to make it feasible for them to offer coverage through MNsure, although any such waiver requests would have to be approved by regulators.Steven Parente, a health insurance expert at the University of Minnesota, called the state’s effort to recruit insurers to MNsure a “distress call” and noted that August 15 is awfully late in the year to be putting out a request for insurer participation, given that open enrollment begins November 1. And ultimately, no new insurers opted to join MNsure for 2017.Blue Cross Blue Shield of MN dropped their individual market PPO plans at the end of 2016 due to significant financial losses. That left Blue Plus (which offered HMOs and covered roughly 13,000 people in 2016 in the individual market) as the only BCBSMN affiliate in the exchange.

    Roughly 103,000 people had to select new plans during open enrollment.Most of those BCBSMN enrollees had off-exchange coverage, though. There were only about 20,400 MNsure enrollees (a little more than one in five MNsure enrollees) with coverage under BCBSMN who needed to switch to another plan during open enrollment. BCBSMN had individual PPO options available in all 87 counties in Minnesota through MNsure in 2016, while the Blue Plus coverage area — comprised of four separate HMO networks — was available in 77 of the state’s counties.Nationwide, carriers have been shifting away from PPOs and towards HMOs and EPOs. In Colorado, Anthem Blue Cross Blue Shield also dropped their PPOs at the end of 2016. In Indiana, there were no PPOs available in the individual market by 2017.

    Blue Cross Blue Shield of New Mexico dropped all of their individual market plans at the end of 2015 except one off-exchange HMO. Blue Cross Blue Shield of Texas dropped their individual market PPO plans at the end of 2015.The broad network offered by PPOs tends to be attractive to enrollees who have health problems. They’re often willing to pay higher premiums in trade for access to broad network of hospitals and specialists. But PPOs are expensive for carriers, as enrollees don’t need primary care referrals to see specialists, and it’s more challenging for carriers to hold down costs when there are more providers in the network.All of the MNsure carriers except Blue Plus are also limiting their total enrollment for 2017. By November 11, 2016, less than two weeks into open enrollment for 2017 coverage, Medica had hit their 50,000 member enrollment cap for 2017 (including on and off-exchange enrollments, and also accounting for expected renewals of 2016 Medica plans), and their policies were no longer available in the individual market in Minnesota, on or off-exchange.

    The only exception was five counties (Benton, Crow Wing, Mille Lacs, Morrison, and Stearns) where Medica agreed not to limit enrollment, as all of the other available carriers in those counties have imposed enrollment caps too. In those five counties, Medica plans continued to be available.At that point, Medica’s market share in MNsure for 2017 stood at 34.2 percent. By December 14, Medica’s market share had dropped to 27.7 percent, as enrollments had continued to climb for the remaining carriers.On January 31, Medica re-opened enrollment for 2017. This was because a smaller-than-expected number of 2016 Medica enrollees renewed their plans for 2017, meaning that the carrier still had some wiggle room under their 50,000 member cap. At that point, they had room for about 7,000 more enrollees.

    Medica plans were thus available throughout the duration of the special enrollment period that was added on at the end of open enrollment, and continue to be available for people with qualifying events.2018. Plans continued to be available from Blue Plus, Health Partners/Group Health (GHI), Medica, UCare. In the months before a decision was reached regarding an extension of the open enrollment window for 2018 plans (the first year that the federal government imposed a shorter, month-and-a-half enrollment window), two of MNsure’s participating insurers had differing positions. UCare believed the exchange should add an additional two-week special enrollment period, while Medica did not want the exchange to have the option to extend the newly-scheduled six-week enrollment window. Notably, Medica capped their enrollment very early during the 2017 open enrollment period, and while UCare also had an enrollment cap, it was set with a target of nearly doubling their 2016 enrollment.

    But Medica is the only MNsure insurer that didn’t set an enrollment cap for 2018.As was the case for 2017, enrollment caps were used in the individual market in Minnesota for 2018 by all insurers other than Medica (Medica did have an enrollment cap for 2017, which they hit very early in open enrollment. However, they resumed enrollments at the end of January 2017). Details about the insurers’ enrollment caps are in the plan binders in SERFF. For 2018, MNsure insurers implemented the following enrollment caps:Blue Plus. 55,000 member cap (aiming for a target of 50,000 effectuated enrollees, but effectuated enrollment is always lower than the number of people who initially enroll)Health Partners/Group Health (GHI).

    73,400 member cap (aiming for a target of 70,000 effectuated enrollees)Medica. No enrollment capUCare. 35,000 member cap (aiming for a target of 30,000 effectuated enrollees)MNsure confirmed in May 2018 that none of their insurers had hit their enrollment caps for 2018.Outside the exchange, PreferredOne had an enrollment cap of 3,000 members, although their 2017 membership was only about 300 people.2019 and 2020. Blue Plus, Health Partners/Group Health, UCare, and Medica have continued to offer plans through MNsure, and all of them continued to participate in 2020 as well. Blue Plus expanded to once again offer statewide coverage in 2020, for the first time since 2016.2021.

    Quartz joined the exchange for 2021, joining the four existing insurers. HealthPartners and UCare are both expanding their coverage areas for 2021.Minnesota Premium Security Plan. 1332 waiver proposal approved by CMS, but with a significant funding cut for MinnesotaCareIn May 2017, Minnesota Governor Mark Dayton submitted a 1332 waiver proposal to CMS. The 1332 waiver was based on H.F.5, which was enacted without Dayton’s signature in April 2017 (Dayton had proposed an alternative measure that would have allowed people in Minnesota to buy into MinnesotaCare. That measure was not able to pass the state’s Republican-dominated legislature).[For more than two decades, MinnesotaCare was a state program subsidizing health insurance for low-income residents.

    As of January 1, 2015, it transitioned to a Basic Health Program under the ACA, becoming the first BHP in the nation.]H.F.5 created the Minnesota Premium Security Plan (MPSP), which is a state-based reinsurance program (similar to the one the ACA implemented on a temporary basis through 2016, and that Alaska created for 2017. Several other states have since implemented reinsurance programs). The reinsurance program, which took effect in Minnesota in 2018, covers a portion of the claims that insurers face, resulting in lower total claims costs for the insurers, and thus lower premiums (average individual market premiums in Minnesota decreased from 2017 to 2018 as a result of the reinsurance program). The reinsurance kicks in once claims reach $50,000, and covers them at 80 percent up to $250,000 (this is similar to the coverage under the transitional reinsurance program that the ACA provided from 2014 through 2016).H.F.5 was contingent upon approval of the 1332 waiver, because it relies partially on federal funding, in addition to state funding. Under the federal approval that was granted in September 2017, the federal government is giving Minnesota the money that they save on premium tax credits, and that money is combined with state funds to implement the reinsurance program (lower premiums — as a result of the reinsurance program — result in the federal government having to pay a smaller total amount of premium tax credits, since the tax credits are smaller when premiums are smaller).It was expected that CMS would approve the state’s 1332 waiver proposal, and Governor Dayton requested that the approval process be swift so that the state could move forward with the implementation of the Minnesota Premium Security Plan in time for the 2018 plan year.

    Dayton indicated that his office had been told that approval would come in August 2017, but CMS didn’t approve the waiver until September 22. And the waiver approval letter noted that the federal savings for MinnesotaCare (the state’s Basic Health Program, or BHP) resulting from the reinsurance program would not be eligible to be passed along to the state — in other words, CMS would keep those savings instead.[Federal BHP funding is equal to 95 percent of the amount that the federal government would have otherwise spent on premium subsidies and cost-sharing reductions for the population that ends up being eligible for the BHP. So lower premiums — as a result of reinsurance — for qualified health plans in the exchange means that the amount the federal government would have had to spend on premium subsidies for that population is lower. That translates into a smaller amount of funding for the state’s BHP, according to the approach that HHS took for Minnesota’s waiver approval.]And based on the scathing letter that Dayton sent CMS a few days earlier, it appeared at that point that Minnesota could actually lose money on the deal — losing more in federal funding for MinnesotaCare than they gain in reinsurance funding. Dayton noted in his letter that the 1332 waiver approval process had been “nightmarish,” and that Minnesota went to great lengths to follow instructions from CMS at every turn, throughout the process of drafting H.F.5 and the 1332 waiver proposal.

    He explains that CMS provided Minnesota with explicit guidance in terms of how to draft the reinsurance program while maintaining full federal funding for MinnesotaCare, and highlighted the fact that the state never deviated from the instructions that were provided.The StarTribune editorial board called out then-Secretary of HHS, Tom Price and the Trump Administration for their lack of clarity on the issue, for apparently misleading the state during the 1332 waiver drafting process, and for effectively punishing the state of Minnesota for taking an innovative approach to ensuring that as many people as possible have health insurance.Insurers filed rates based on reinsurance being available. And by the time the waiver was approved, there was very little time to evaluate the potential impacts of the funding changes, as rates had to be finalized by October 2 in Minnesota. The finalized rates did incorporate the reinsurance program. The state has accepted the approved waiver, but Gov. Dayton sent a letter to HHS on October 3, asking them to reconsider the MinnesotaCare funding cuts, but the issue has remained unresolved.Elimination of CSR funding results in additional funding cut for MinnesotaCare, but a lawsuit has partially restored that fundingNationwide, 54 percent of exchange enrollees benefit from cost-sharing subsidies.

    But in Minnesota, only 13 percent of exchange enrollees are receiving cost-sharing subsidies. This is because of MinnesotaCare, which covers all enrollees with income up to 200 percent of the poverty level. That’s the same group that would otherwise benefit the most from cost-sharing subsidies, so the fact that MinnesotaCare is available means that most of the people who would otherwise be enrolled in cost-sharing subsidy plans are instead enrolled in MinnesotaCare.At first glance, this would appear to have made the uncertainty surrounding cost-sharing subsidy funding in 2017 a little less of a pressing issue in Minnesota than it was in many other states, since private insurers weren’t facing the sort of losses that insurers in other states were facing without federal funding for CSR. But when the Trump Administration eliminated federal funding for CSR in October 2017, HHS took the position tha t since CSR funding had been eliminated, the CSR portion of the federal funding for the BHPs in New York and Minnesota would be reduced to $0. This was not a cut-and-dried conclusion, however, as explained earlier in 2017 by Michael Kalina.In January 2018, the Attorneys General for New York and Minnesota filed a lawsuit against the US Department of Health and Human Services, seeking to restore funding for their Basic Health Programs.

    A judge ruled in favor of the states in May 2018, ensuring that MinnesotaCare would continue to receive at least some CSR-based funding. The amount awarded to the state for the first quarter of 2018 was just over half of what the state had initially expected in CSR-related funding, but a larger chuck of the funding was restored later in 2018. According to the Star Tribune, however, Minnesota still ended up losing $161 million in federal funding for MinnesotaCare due to the CSR funding cuts.In early 2019, the Trump administration proposed yet another funding cut (a third, after the cuts imposed by the reinsurance program and the elimination of CSR funding) as part of a new methodology for calculating BHP funding. This one was much smaller than the other two cuts, but taken together the funding reductions are pushing MinnesotaCare towards a looming budget shortfall. SHOP exchange.

    Down to one carrier as of 2016, zero by 2018 (and still zero in 2019)In 2015, there were two carriers in MNsure’s SHOP exchange for small businesses. Blue Cross Blue Shield of Minnesota, and Medica. But Medica announced in 2015 that they would exit the SHOP exchange in Minnesota, North Dakota, and Wisconsin at the end of the year. That left BCBS as the only small group carrier available through MNsure in 2016, but it didn’t change much from a practical standpoint, since 83 percent of MNsure’s small groups were enrolled in plans through BCBS in 2015. Indeed, Medica’s reason for exiting the small business exchange was based on low enrollment in the first two years.Blue Cross Blue Shield of Minnesota continued to be the only insurer offering SHOP coverage via MNsure in 2017, but announced in July 2017 that they would no longer offer SHOP coverage in 2018, and would instead transition their SHOP enrollees to small business coverage outside the exchange.

    At that point, there were only 3,287 people enrolled in SHOP coverage in Minnesota — far below the 155,000 people that were originally projected to have coverage through MNsure’s SHOP program by 2016 (this much lower-than-anticipated enrollment has been the case in nearly every state’s SHOP exchange. This situation is not unique to Minnesota). State law provided 25% premium rebate in 2017. Amendment to allow plans without essential benefits was cut from final legislationThroughout 2016, then-Governor Dayton called for a state-funded premium rebate for people who buy their own insurance but aren’t eligible for the ACA’s premium subsidies (those are only available for people with income up to 400 percent of the poverty level, or $100,400 for a family of four in 2019).Governor Dayton also noted that the government needed to act quickly to stabilize the individual market in Minnesota, and by late November 2016, his patience with lawmakers was wearing thin. In a November 23 press conference, Dayton said that House Republicans needed to “stop dilly-dallying” and decide whether to move forward with Dayton’s rebate proposal.Dayton had also indicated that he was considering calling a special session of the legislature after election day to address the situation, and that was being negotiated for December 20.

    But the talks fell through when Dayton and Republican House Speaker Kurt Daudt couldn’t agree on the three bills that would have been addressed in the special session. As a result, there was no special session.Instead, the issue was taken up by lawmakers as soon as the 2017 legislative session began. On January 5, Minnesota Senators Michelle Benson (R, 31st District) and Gary Dahms (R, 16th District) introduced S.F.1. The bill called for using $300 million in state funding to provide a 25 percent rebate to roughly 125,000 people in Minnesota.S.F.1 passed the Minnesota Senate by a 35-31 vote on January 12. Only one DFL Senator (Melisa Franzen, from Edina) voted with Republicans in favor of the legislation.

    It was then sent to the House, where an amendment was added that stripped out the requirement that health plans provide various mandated benefits (see “Journal of the Day” section “Top of page 154” in this version of the bill. Under the terms of the amendment, as long as a carrier offered at least one plan with all the mandated benefits, they would have been allowed to offer others without mandated benefits).The amended bill was sent back to the Senate on January 23. Differences between the bills that the two chambers passed had to be reconciled before being sent to Governor Dayton for his signature. By that point, the amendment to allow less-robust plans to be sold had garnered national attention, and public outrage helped to push lawmakers away from the provision. S.F.1 had also called for $150 million to be appropriated for fiscal year 2018 (through June 30, 2019) from the state general fund to a state-based reinsurance program to stabilize the individual market (Alaska did something similar in 2016, preventing a market collapse), but that provision was also removed in the final version (Minnesota did ultimately set up a reinsurance program, effective in 2018, which has served to stabilize the market and reduce premiums).A Conference Committee in the Senate recommended that the House “recede from its amendments” and the Conference Committee report passed the Senate on a 47-19 vote.

    The House passed the bill a few hours later, 108-19. It was sent to Governor Dayton, who immediately signed it into law. DFLers did have to compromise on one issue during the process. S.F.1 allows for-profit HMOs to begin operating in Minnesota’s individual market, which had long been limited to non-profit HMOs.Consumers were told to expect the premium rebates to show up by April 2017, but they were retroactively effective to January 2017. So a person who had been paying full price for a plan since January 2017 saw a substantial premium reduction on the April or May invoice.

    Going forward, for the remainder of the year, a 25 percent rebate applied each month.Since S.F.1 was signed into law with only a few days remaining in open enrollment (it ended January 31 that year), Governor Dayton and exchange officials were worried that there wouldn’t be enough time for people to learn about the rebate and apply for coverage before January 31. In December, Dayton had asked HHS to allow MNsure to extend its enrollment deadline to February 28 (instead of January 31) in order to allow lawmakers more time to work out the details of a state-based premium rebate while still allowing people to enroll after the legislative process is complete.HHS denied the request for a blanket extension, but MNsure used their own authority on January 28 to grant a one-week special enrollment period (February 1 to February 8) due to exceptional circumstances. Although the state-based 25 percent premium rebate was available on or off the exchange, the one-week extension was only valid through MNsure. Health insurers did not have to accept off-exchange enrollments without a qualifying event after January 31.The 25 percent premium rebate program in Minnesota was only authorized for one year, so the rebates did not continue into 2018. And although almost 100,000 people received premium relief through the program in 2017, it ended up costing less than the legislature had allocated, and about $100 million was returned to the state’s budget at the end of 2017.Protecting Medicaid enrollees from estate liensIn every state, Medicaid is jointly funded by the state and the federal government.

    Longstanding federal regulations, which predate the ACA, require states to “seek recovery of payments from the individual’s estate for nursing facility services, home and community-based services, and related hospital and prescription drug services” for any Medicaid enrollee over the age of 55. This applies essentially to long-term care services, but states also have the option to go after the individual’s estate to recover costs for other care that was provided by Medicaid after age 55.Prior to 2014, this wasn’t typically an issue, as Medicaid eligibility was generally restricted by asset tests or requirements that applicants be disabled or pregnant (although Minnesota did have much more generous Medicaid eligibility guidelines than most states prior to 2014). But as of 2014, in states that expanded Medicaid under the ACA, the only eligibility guideline is income. Applicants with income that doesn’t exceed 138 percent of the poverty level are directed to Medicaid, regardless of any assets they might have.When applicants use the health insurance exchange — MNsure in Minnesota — they’re automatically funneled into Medical Assistance (Medicaid) if their income is under 138 percent of the poverty level. But what these enrollees didn’t know was that the state also had a program in place to put liens on estates for Medicaid-provided services for people age 55 and older.The combination of these systems caught numerous residents off guard.

    They were enrolled in Medical Assistance through MNsure based on their income, but were not aware that liens were being placed on their homes so that the state could recoup the costs upon their deaths.State Senator Tony Lourey (DFL, District 11) addressed the issue with language included in HF2749, the Omnibus supplemental budget bill, which was signed into law by Governor Dayton on June 1, 2016. The legislation limits estate recovery to just what’s required under federal Medicaid rules (ie, essentially, long-term care costs for people age 55 or older), and makes the provision retroactive to January 1, 2014.Early tech strugglesMNsure opened for business in the fall of 2013, but technological issues persisted well into 2015, despite numerous improvements throughout 2014. Given MNsure’s difficult launch, the state conducted a series of audits and reviews. The first audit reviewed how MNsure spent state and federal money. Auditors concluded that the exchange has generally adequate internal controls and found no fraud or abuse.

    The review was conducted by the state Office of the Legislative Auditor, and the report was published in October 2014.Another audit, also conducted by the Office of the Legislative Auditor and released in November 2014, found that the MNsure system in some cases incorrectly determined who qualified for public health benefits. The errors occurred during the first open enrollment period, before a series of system fixes were implemented. The audit did not quantify the total financial impact of the errors. The state Human Services commissioner said a consultant working on technical fixes to MNsure concluded that the eligibility functionality was working correctly as of June 2014.A third audit, a performance evaluation report released in February 2015, said “MNsure’s failures outweighed its achievements.” Among other criticisms, auditors said MNsure staff withheld information from the board of directors and state officials, the enrollment website was seriously flawed and launched without adequate testing, and the first-year enrollment target was unrealistically low.In April 2014, MNsure hired Deloitte Consulting to audit MNsure’s technology and improve the website to make enrolling in coverage and updating life events easier and more streamlined. Deloitte has been involved in successful state-run marketplaces for Connecticut, Kentucky, Rhode Island and Washington.Software upgrades were installed in August 2014, and system testing continued right up until the start of open enrollment.

    To reduce wait times for consumers and insurance professionals, MNsure increased its call center and support staff and launched a dedicated service line for agents and brokers.More in-person assisters were available in Minnesota for the 2015 open enrollment period. MNsure encourages residents to utilize the exchange’s assister directory to find local navigators and brokers who can help with the enrollment process.MNsure has improved dramatically in terms of its technology since the early days of ACA implementation, and enrollment increased every year from 2014 through 2019.Lawmakers approved switching to HealthCare.gov as of 2019, but governor vetoedOn May 9, 2017, lawmakers in Minnesota passed SF800, an omnibus health and human services bill. Among many other things, the legislation called for switching from MNsure to the federally-run marketplace (HealthCare.gov) starting in 2019 (see Section 5). But Governor Dayton vetoed it.Gov. Dayton has long been supportive of MNsure, and had previously clarified that he would veto the bill.

    In noting his plans to veto the legislation, Dayton made no mention of the transition to HealthCare.gov that was included in the legislation, but focused instead on the sharp budget cuts in the bill. But his veto ensured that MNsure would remain in place, at least for the time being.The Senate’s original version of SF800 did not call for scrapping MNsure, but the bill went through considerable back-and-forth between the two chambers, and the version that passed was the 4th engrossment of the bill.In March 2015, Dayton had asked the legislature to create a Task Force on Health Care Financing that would study MNsure along with possible future alternatives. Dayton noted in his letter that he supported making MNsure “directly accountable to the governor and subject to the same legislative oversight as other state agencies” and his budget included half a million dollars devoted to the task force. The spending bill was approved by the legislature in May, and the 29-member task force was appointed in the summer.One of the possibilities that the task force considered was the possibility of switching to Healthcare.gov, but it’s clear that there was no cut-and-dried answer to the question of whether Minnesota is better served by having a state-run exchange, switching to a federally-run exchange, or teaming up with the federal government on either a supported state-based marketplace or partnership exchange.In a December 2015 meeting of the task force, the MN Department of Human Services presented a financial analysis of the alternatives available to MNsure. They determined that switching entirely to Healthcare.gov would cost the state an additional $5.1 million in one-time costs from June 2016 to June 2017.

    And switching to a supported state-based marketplace would cost an additional $6.6 million during that same time frame. If the state had opted to switch to Healthcare.gov, the soonest it could have happened was 2018, since HHS requires a year’s notice from states wishing to transition to Healthcare.gov, and Minnesota wouldn’t have been in a position to make a decision until sometime in 2016.There were significant reservations about making that switch prior to the Supreme Court’s ruling on King v. Burwell. The Court ruled in June 2015 that subsidies are legal in every state, including those that use Healthcare.gov. Prior to the decision, a switch to Healthcare.gov could have jeopardized subsidies for tens of thousands of Minnesota residents.

    But once it was clear that Healthcare.gov’s subsidies are safe, some stakeholders began calling for Minnesota to scrap its state-run exchange and use Healthcare.gov instead. Because the MNsure task force was included in the 2016 budget, no hasty decisions were made.In January 2016, the task force submitted their recommendations to the legislature. They covered a broad range of issues, but did not recommend that MNsure transition to the federal enrollment platform. Lawmakers essentially left the exchange alone during the 2016 legislative session.The magnitude of the 2016 rate increases that were announced in October resulted in MNsure opponents renewing their calls to switch to Healthcare.gov. But it’s important to keep in mind that the 41 percent weighted average rate hike in Minnesota was market-wide, and did not just apply to MNsure enrollees.

    In fact, the off-exchange carrier (PreferredOne) had among the highest rate hikes in the state for 2016, at 39 percent, and the exchange’s weighted average rate increase (38.5 percent) was lower than the weighted average rate increase for the whole individual market (41 percent).Minnesota health insurance exchange linksMNsure855-3MNSURE (855-366-7873)State Exchange Profile. MinnesotaThe Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation overview of Minnesota’s progress toward creating a state health insurance exchange.Louise Norris is an individual health insurance broker who has been writing about health insurance and health reform since 2006. She has written dozens of opinions and educational pieces about the Affordable Care Act for healthinsurance.org. Her state health exchange updates are regularly cited by media who cover health reform and by other health insurance experts.Key takeaways Medicaid expansion in HawaiiHawaii adopted Medicaid expansion through the Affordable Care Act, extending eligibility for Medicaid to adults with income up to 133 percent of the poverty level (138 percent with the automatic 5 percent income disregard).

    Medicaid expansion took effect in January 2014.According to the Kaiser Family Foundation, about 70,000 Hawaii residents were uninsured in 2015. With Medicaid expansion now covering low-income, nonelderly adults, 50 percent of Hawaii’s remaining uninsured population at that point was eligible for Medicaid – although they may not realize that they’re eligible. According to U.S. Census data, only 3.5 percent of Hawaii residents were uninsured as of 2016, down from 6.7 percent in 2013. Although the state’s uninsured rate was reduced by nearly half from 2013 to 2016, it was already less than half of the national average uninsured rate even in 2013, before the bulk of the ACA’s provisions had taken effect.

    Hawaii’s Prepaid Health Care Act, which has been in place since the 1970s, had already resulted in nearly all of the state’s population having insurance coverage, even before the ACA took effect. However, with the coronavirus outbreak, job losses and the subsequent loss of employer-provided insurance have contributed to a jump in the uninsured rate across the U.S. As of May 2020, Hawaii’s uninsured rate was 10 percent.Medicaid expansion helped cement top-ranking health scores Federalpoverty levelcalculator 0.0% of Federal Poverty Level Hawaii has a long history of supporting initiatives to make health insurance broadly available to residents. Hawaii was among the first six states that implemented a Medicaid program in January 1966, just six months after federal legislation authorizing the program was enacted. In 1974, Hawaii implemented its Prepaid Health Care Act, which mandated that most employers make health insurance available to employees who work at least 20 hours a week.In conjunction with the Affordable Care Act (ACA), Hawaii initially implemented a state-run health insurance marketplace and adopted Medicaid expansion.

    The marketplace transitioned to a federally-supported state-run marketplace for 2016, and transitioned again to a fully federally-run exchange for 2017, largely in an effort to take advantage of the economies of scale that the federally-run exchange could bring to a state with low overall enrollment in the individual market (because of Hawaii’s Prepaid Health Care Act, nearly all non-elderly Hawaii residents get coverage from an employer, and relatively few need coverage under individual market plans). Nothing changed about Medicaid with the switch to Healthcare.gov though. The expanded Medicaid eligibility guidelines are still in effect in Hawaii.Through its efforts, Hawaii consistently has low uninsured rates and high overall health scores. As of 2015, Hawaii was ranked the healthiest state in the nation according to the Gallup Healthways Physical Wellbeing Index, and the state consistently scores near the top in other ranking systems (number 2 the America’s Health Rankings 2017 survey, and number 3 in the Commonwealth Fund’s 2017 Scorecard on State Health System Performance).Who is eligible for Medicaid in Hawaii?. Hawaii’s Medicaid eligibility levels for children are much higher than the national average and about average for pregnant women and parents.Children ages 0-18 qualify with family income levels up to 308 of the federal poverty level (FPL)Pregnant women qualify with family income up to 191 percent of FPLParents and other adults qualify with family income up to 138 percent of FPLHawaii also uses Medicaid funds to help cover premium costs for Hawaii residents who aren’t U.S.

    Citizens but who are citizens of nations that have entered into the Compact of Free Association (COFA) with the U.S.How do I enroll in Medicaid in Hawaii?. Hawaii’s Medicaid program is called MED-QUEST (MQD). QUEST stands for Quality care, Universal access, Efficient utilization, Stabilizing costs, and Transforming the way health care is provided to recipients.You can apply for MED-QUEST. Hawaii Medicaid enrollment numbersMore than 351,000 people were enrolled in Hawaii’s Medicaid and CHIP programs as of June 2020. This figure is a 22% increase over 2013 (pre-ACA) enrollment, when about 288,000 people were enrolled.

    Accordingly to the Kaiser Family Foundation, 107,300 of those enrolled in Hawaii Medicaid are part of the ACA-authorized expansion as of June 2019.Hawaii Medicaid historyHawaii implemented its Medicaid program in January 1966.In the early 1990s, Hawaii implemented the State Health Insurance Program (SHIP) to cover people who weren’t eligible for Medicaid. Then, in 1994, CMS approved Hawaii’s section 1115 Medicaid waiver (one of the first in the nation) to wrap SHIP in with Medicaid in an effort to achieve universal insurance coverage (in combination with the state’s Prepaid Health Care Act). The result of the waiver was the creation of Hawaii’s MED-QUEST program, which initially covered low-income women and children, but has since expanded (as of 2009) to cover nearly all of Hawaii’s Medicaid beneficiaries. The MED-QUEST waiver is subject to renewal every five years.Medicaid in Hawaii is separated into two different methods of providing services. The fee-for-service (FFS) program and the managed care program, called MED-QUEST or MQD.

    Under the FFS program, doctors and other healthcare providers bill Medicaid directly to be reimbursed for services provided to Medicaid beneficiaries. Under MED-QUEST, the state contracts with managed care plans who in turn provide healthcare services to Medicaid beneficiaries.As of 2011, more than 98 percent of the people enrolled in Hawaii’s Medicaid program were covered through managed care. By March 2015, Kaiser Family Foundation reported that 335,007 Medicaid enrollees in Hawaii were covered under managed care programs. That’s higher than the August 2015 total Medicaid/CHIP enrollment count, but KFF notes that the managed care number includes people who are covered under Hawaii’s fully-state-funded Medicaid program, in addition to the majority of enrollees who are in regular Medicaid that’s funded partially by the state and partially by the federal government.In August 2017, Hawaii submitted a waiver amendment to CMS in order to gain federal approval to use Medicaid funding to provide housing services to qualified Medicaid enrollees who are homeless and also have behavioral health and/or substance abuse problems. That waiver request was still pending as of February 2018.Louise Norris is an individual health insurance broker who has been writing about health insurance and health reform since 2006.

    She has written dozens of opinions and educational pieces about the Affordable Care Act for healthinsurance.org. Her state health exchange updates are regularly cited by media who cover health reform and by other health insurance experts..

    Lowest price vaniqa

    High burden of antibiotic-resistant Mycoplasma genitalium lowest price vaniqa in symptomatic urethritisMycoplasma genitalium is an aetiological agent of sexually transmitted urethritis. A cohort study investigated M. Genitalium prevalence, antibiotic resistance and association with previous macrolide exposure among 1816 Chinese men who presented with symptomatic urethritis between 2011 and 2015 lowest price vaniqa.

    Infection was diagnosed by PCR, and sequencing was used to detect mutations that confer resistance to macrolides and fluoroquinolones. In 11% lowest price vaniqa of men, M. Genitalium was the sole pathogen identified.

    Nearly 90% of infections were lowest price vaniqa resistant to macrolides and fluoroquinolones. Previous macrolide exposure was associated with higher prevalence of resistance (97%). The findings lowest price vaniqa point to the need for routine screening for M.

    Genitalium in symptomatic men with urethritis. Treatment strategies to lowest price vaniqa overcome antibiotic resistance in M. Genitalium are needed.Yang L, Xiaohong S, Wenjing L, et al.

    Mycoplasma genitalium in symptomatic male lowest price vaniqa urethritis. Macrolide use is associated with increased resistance. Clin Infect Dis 2020;5:805–10.

    Doi:10.1093/cid/ciz294.A new entry inhibitor offers promise for lowest price vaniqa treatment-experienced patients with multidrug-resistant HIVFostemsavir, the prodrug of temsavir, is an attachment inhibitor. By targeting the gp120 protein on the HIV-1 envelope, it prevents viral interaction with the CD4 receptor. No cross-resistance has been described with other antiretroviral lowest price vaniqa agents, including those that target viral entry by other modalities.

    In the phase III BRIGHTE trial, 371 highly treatment-experienced patients who had exhausted ≥4 classes of antiretrovirals received fostemsavir with an optimised regimen. After 48 weeks, 54% of those with 1–2 lowest price vaniqa additional active drugs achieved viral load suppression <40 copies/mL. Response rates were 38% among patients lacking other active agents.

    Drug-related adverse events lowest price vaniqa included nausea (4%) and diarrhoea (3%). As gp120 substitutions reduced fostemsavir susceptibility in up to 70% of patients with virological failure, fostemsavir offers the most valuable salvage option in partnership with other active drugs.Kozal M, Aberg J, Pialoux G, et al. Fostemsavir in adults with multidrug-resistant HIV-1 infection lowest price vaniqa.

    N Engl J Med 2020;382:1232–43. Doi. 10.1056/NEJMoa1902493Novel tools to aid identification of hepatitis C in primary careHepatitis C can now be cured with oral antiviral treatment, and improving diagnosis is a key element of elimination strategies.1 A cluster randomised controlled trial in South West England tested performance and cost-effectiveness of an electronic algorithm that identified at-risk patients in primary care according to national recommendations,2 coupled with educational activities and interventions to increase patients’ awareness.

    Outcomes were testing uptake, diagnosis and referral to specialist care. Practices in the intervention arm had an increase in all outcome measures, with adjusted risk ratios of 1.59 (1.21–2.08) for uptake, 2.24 (1.47–3.42) for diagnosis and 5.78 (1.60–21.6) for referral. The intervention was highly cost-effective.

    Electronic algorithms applied to practice systems could enhance testing and diagnosis of hepatitis C in primary care, contributing to global elimination goals.Roberts K, Macleod J, Metcalfe C, et al. Cost-effectiveness of an intervention to increase uptake of hepatitis C virus testing and treatment (HepCATT). Cluster randomised controlled trial in primary care.

    BMJ 2020;368:m322. Doi:10.1136/bmj.m322Low completion rates for antiretroviral postexposure prophylaxis (PEP) after sexual assaultA 4-week course of triple-agent postexposure prophylaxis (PEP) is recommended following a high-risk sexual assault.3 4 A retrospective study in Barcelona identified 1695 victims attending an emergency room (ER) between 2006 and 2015. Overall, 883 (52%) started prophylaxis in ER, which was mostly (43%) lopinavir/ritonavir based.

    Follow-up appointments were arranged for those living in Catalonia (631, 71.5%), and of these, only 183 (29%) completed treatment. Loss to follow-up was more prevalent in those residing outside Barcelona. PEP non-completion was associated with a low perceived risk, previous assaults, a known aggressor and a positive cocaine test.

    Side effects were common, occurring in up to 65% of those taking lopinavir/ritonavir and accounting for 15% of all discontinuations. More tolerable PEP regimens, accessible follow-up and provision of 1-month supply may improve completion rates.Inciarte A, Leal L, Masfarre L, et al. Postexposure prophylaxis for HIV infection in sexual assault victims.

    HIV Med 2020;21:43–52. Doi:10.1111/hiv.12797.Effective antiretroviral therapy reduces anal high-risk HPV infection and cancer riskAmong people with HIV, effective antiretroviral therapy (ART) is expected to improve control of anal infection with high-risk human papillomavirus (HR-HPV) and reduce the progression of HPV-associated anal lesions. The magnitude of the effect is not well established.

    By meta-analysis, people on established ART (vs ART-naive) had a 35% lower prevalence of HR-HPV infection, and those with undetectable viral load (vs detectable viral load) had a 27% and 16% reduced risk of low and high-grade anal lesions, respectively. Sustained virological suppression on ART reduced by 44% the risk of anal cancer. The role of effective ART in reducing anal HR-HPV infection and cancer risks is especially salient given current limitations in anal cancer screening, high rates of anal lesion recurrence and access to vaccination.Kelly H, Chikandiwa A, Alemany Vilches L, et al.

    Association of antiretroviral therapy with anal high-risk human papillomavirus, anal intraepithelial neoplasia and anal cancer in people living with HIV. A systematic review and meta-analysis. Lancet HIV.

    2020;7:e262–78. Doi:10.1016/S2352-3018(19)30434-5.The impact of sex work laws and stigma on HIV prevention among female sex workersSex work laws and stigma have been established as structural risk factors for HIV acquisition among female sex workers (FSWs). However, individual-level data assessing these relationships are limited.

    A study examined individual-level data collected in 2011–2018 from 7259 FSWs across 10 sub-Saharan African countries. An association emerged between HIV prevalence and increasingly punitive and non-protective laws. HIV prevalence among FSWs was 11.6%, 19.6% and 39.4% in contexts where sex work was partly legalised, not recognised or criminalised, respectively.

    Stigma measures such as fear of seeking health services, mistreatment in healthcare settings, lack of police protection, blackmail and violence were associated with higher HIV prevalence and more punitive settings. Sex work laws that protect sex workers and reduce structural risks are needed.Lyons CE, Schwartz SR, Murray SM, et al. The role of sex work laws and stigmas in increasing HIV risks among sex workers.

    Nat Commun 2020;11:773. Doi:10.1038/s41467-020-14593-6.BackgroundCumbria Sexual Health Services (CSHS) in collaboration with Cumbria Public Health and local authorities have established a COVID-19 contact tracing pathway for Cumbria. The local system was live 10 days prior to the national system on 18 May 2020.

    It was designed to interface and dovetail with the government’s track and trace programme.Our involvement in this initiative was due to a chance meeting between Professor Matt Phillips, Consultant in Sexual Health and HIV, and the Director of Public Health Cumbria, Colin Cox. Colin knew that Cumbria needed to act fast to prevent the transmission of COVID-19 and Matt knew that sexual health had the skills to help.ProcessDespite over 90% of the staff from CSHS being redeployed in March 2020, CSHS maintained urgent sexual healthcare for the county and a phone line for advice and guidance. As staff began to return to the service in May 2020 we had capacity to spare seven staff members, whose hours were the equivalent of four full-time staff.

    We had one system administrator, three healthcare assistants, one nurse, Health Advisor Helen Musker and myself.CSHS were paramount to the speed with which the local system began. Following approval from the Trust’s chief executive officer we had adapted our electronic patient records (EPR) system, developed a standard operating procedure and trained staff, using a stepwise competency model, within just 1 day.In collaboration with the local laboratories we developed methods for the input of positive COVID-19 results into our EPR derivative. We ensured that labs would be able to cope with the increase in testing and that testing hubs had additional capacity.

    Testing sites and occupational health were asked to inform patients that if they tested positive they would be contacted by our teams.This initiative involved a multiagency system including local public health (PH) teams, local authority, North Cumbria and Morecambe Bay CCGs, Public Health England (PHE) and the military. If CSHS recognise more than one positive result in the same area/organisation, they flag this with PH at the daily incident management meeting and environmental health officers (EHOs) provide advice and guidance for the organisation. We have had an active role in the contact tracing for clusters in local general practices, providing essential information to PH to enable them to initiate outbreak control and provide accurate advice to the practices.

    We are an integral part in recognising cases in large organisations and ensuring prompt action is taken to stem the spread of the disease. The team have provided out-of-hours work to ensure timely and efficient action is taken for all contacts.The local contact tracing pilot has evolved and a database was established by local authorities. Our data fed directly into this from the end of May 2020.

    This enables the multiagency team to record data in one place, improving recognition of patterns of transmission.DiscussionCumbria is covered by three National Health Service Trusts, which meant accessing data outside of our Trust was challenging and took more time to establish. There are two CCGs for Cumbria, which meant discussions regarding testing were needed with both North and South CCGs and variations in provision had to be accounted for. There are six boroughs in Cumbria with different teams of EHOs working in each.

    With so many people involved, not only is there need for large-scale frequent communication across a multisystem team, there is also inevitable duplication of work.Lockdown is easing and sexual health clinics are increasing capacity in a new world of virtual appointments and reduced face-to-face consultations. Staff within the contact tracing team are now balancing their commitments across both teams to maintain their skills and keep abreast of the rapid developments within our service due to COVID-19. We are currently applying for funding from PH in order to second staff and backfill posts in sexual health.ConclusionCSHS have been able to lend our skills effectively to the local contact tracing efforts.

    We have expedited the contact tracing in Cumbria and provided crucial information to help contain outbreaks. It has had a positive effect on staff morale within the service and we have gained national recognition for our work. We have developed excellent relationships with our local PH team, PHE, Cumbria Council, EHOs and both CCGs.Cumbria has the infrastructure to meet the demands of a second wave of COVID-19.

    The beauty of this model is that if we are faced with a second lockdown, sexual health staff will inevitably be available to help with the increased demand for contact tracing. Our ambition is that this model will be replicated nationally..

    High burden of antibiotic-resistant Mycoplasma genitalium in symptomatic urethritisMycoplasma genitalium is an aetiological agent online doctor vaniqa of sexually transmitted urethritis. A cohort study investigated M. Genitalium prevalence, antibiotic resistance and association with previous macrolide exposure among 1816 Chinese men online doctor vaniqa who presented with symptomatic urethritis between 2011 and 2015. Infection was diagnosed by PCR, and sequencing was used to detect mutations that confer resistance to macrolides and fluoroquinolones.

    In 11% online doctor vaniqa of men, M. Genitalium was the sole pathogen identified. Nearly 90% of infections were resistant to online doctor vaniqa macrolides and fluoroquinolones. Previous macrolide exposure was associated with higher prevalence of resistance (97%).

    The findings point online doctor vaniqa to the need for routine screening for M. Genitalium in symptomatic men with urethritis. Treatment strategies to overcome antibiotic resistance in online doctor vaniqa M. Genitalium are needed.Yang L, Xiaohong S, Wenjing L, et al.

    Mycoplasma genitalium in symptomatic male online doctor vaniqa urethritis. Macrolide use is associated with increased resistance. Clin Infect Dis 2020;5:805–10. Doi:10.1093/cid/ciz294.A new online doctor vaniqa entry inhibitor offers promise for treatment-experienced patients with multidrug-resistant HIVFostemsavir, the prodrug of temsavir, is an attachment inhibitor.

    By targeting the gp120 protein on the HIV-1 envelope, it prevents viral interaction with the CD4 receptor. No cross-resistance has been described with other antiretroviral online doctor vaniqa agents, including those that target viral entry by other modalities. In the phase III BRIGHTE trial, 371 highly treatment-experienced patients who had exhausted ≥4 classes of antiretrovirals received fostemsavir with an optimised regimen. After 48 weeks, 54% of those online doctor vaniqa with 1–2 additional active drugs achieved viral load suppression <40 copies/mL.

    Response rates were 38% among patients lacking other active agents. Drug-related adverse events included nausea (4%) and diarrhoea online doctor vaniqa (3%). As gp120 substitutions reduced fostemsavir susceptibility in up to 70% of patients with virological failure, fostemsavir offers the most valuable salvage option in partnership with other active drugs.Kozal M, Aberg J, Pialoux G, et al. Fostemsavir in adults with multidrug-resistant HIV-1 infection online doctor vaniqa.

    N Engl J Med 2020;382:1232–43. Doi. 10.1056/NEJMoa1902493Novel tools to aid identification of hepatitis C in primary careHepatitis C can now be cured with oral antiviral treatment, and improving diagnosis is a key element of elimination strategies.1 A cluster randomised controlled trial in South West England tested performance and cost-effectiveness of an electronic algorithm that identified at-risk patients in primary care according to national recommendations,2 coupled with educational activities and interventions to increase patients’ awareness. Outcomes were testing uptake, diagnosis and referral to specialist care.

    Practices in the intervention arm had an increase in all outcome measures, with adjusted risk ratios of 1.59 (1.21–2.08) for uptake, 2.24 (1.47–3.42) for diagnosis and 5.78 (1.60–21.6) for referral. The intervention was highly cost-effective. Electronic algorithms applied to practice systems could enhance testing and diagnosis of hepatitis C in primary care, contributing to global elimination goals.Roberts K, Macleod J, Metcalfe C, et al. Cost-effectiveness of an intervention to increase uptake of hepatitis C virus testing and treatment (HepCATT).

    Cluster randomised controlled trial in primary care. BMJ 2020;368:m322. Doi:10.1136/bmj.m322Low completion rates for antiretroviral postexposure prophylaxis (PEP) after sexual assaultA 4-week course of triple-agent postexposure prophylaxis (PEP) is recommended following a high-risk sexual assault.3 4 A retrospective study in Barcelona identified 1695 victims attending an emergency room (ER) between 2006 and 2015. Overall, 883 (52%) started prophylaxis in ER, which was mostly (43%) lopinavir/ritonavir based.

    Follow-up appointments were arranged for those living in Catalonia (631, 71.5%), and of these, only 183 (29%) completed treatment. Loss to follow-up was more prevalent in those residing outside Barcelona. PEP non-completion was associated with a low perceived risk, previous assaults, a known aggressor and a positive cocaine test. Side effects were common, occurring in up to 65% of those taking lopinavir/ritonavir and accounting for 15% of all discontinuations.

    More tolerable PEP regimens, accessible follow-up and provision of 1-month supply may improve completion rates.Inciarte A, Leal L, Masfarre L, et al. Postexposure prophylaxis for HIV infection in sexual assault victims. HIV Med 2020;21:43–52. Doi:10.1111/hiv.12797.Effective antiretroviral therapy reduces anal high-risk HPV infection and cancer riskAmong people with HIV, effective antiretroviral therapy (ART) is expected to improve control of anal infection with high-risk human papillomavirus (HR-HPV) and reduce the progression of HPV-associated anal lesions.

    The magnitude of the effect is not well established. By meta-analysis, people on established ART (vs ART-naive) had a 35% lower prevalence of HR-HPV infection, and those with undetectable viral load (vs detectable viral load) had a 27% and 16% reduced risk of low and high-grade anal lesions, respectively. Sustained virological suppression on ART reduced by 44% the risk of anal cancer. The role of effective ART in reducing anal HR-HPV infection and cancer risks is especially salient given current limitations in anal cancer screening, high rates of anal lesion recurrence and access to vaccination.Kelly H, Chikandiwa A, Alemany Vilches L, et al.

    Association of antiretroviral therapy with anal high-risk human papillomavirus, anal intraepithelial neoplasia and anal cancer in people living with HIV. A systematic review and meta-analysis. Lancet HIV. 2020;7:e262–78.

    Doi:10.1016/S2352-3018(19)30434-5.The impact of sex work laws and stigma on HIV prevention among female sex workersSex work laws and stigma have been established as structural risk factors for HIV acquisition among female sex workers (FSWs). However, individual-level data assessing these relationships are limited. A study examined individual-level data collected in 2011–2018 from 7259 FSWs across 10 sub-Saharan African countries. An association emerged between HIV prevalence and increasingly punitive and non-protective laws.

    HIV prevalence among FSWs was 11.6%, 19.6% and 39.4% in contexts where sex work was partly legalised, not recognised or criminalised, respectively. Stigma measures such as fear of seeking health services, mistreatment in healthcare settings, lack of police protection, blackmail and violence were associated with higher HIV prevalence and more punitive settings. Sex work laws that protect sex workers and reduce structural risks are needed.Lyons CE, Schwartz SR, Murray SM, et al. The role of sex work laws and stigmas in increasing HIV risks among sex workers.

    Nat Commun 2020;11:773. Doi:10.1038/s41467-020-14593-6.BackgroundCumbria Sexual Health Services (CSHS) in collaboration with Cumbria Public Health and local authorities have established a COVID-19 contact tracing pathway for Cumbria. The local system was live 10 days prior to the national system on 18 May 2020. It was designed to interface and dovetail with the government’s track and trace programme.Our involvement in this initiative was due to a chance meeting between Professor Matt Phillips, Consultant in Sexual Health and HIV, and the Director of Public Health Cumbria, Colin Cox.

    Colin knew that Cumbria needed to act fast to prevent the transmission of COVID-19 and Matt knew that sexual health had the skills to help.ProcessDespite over 90% of the staff from CSHS being redeployed in March 2020, CSHS maintained urgent sexual healthcare for the county and a phone line for advice and guidance. As staff began to return to the service in May 2020 we had capacity to spare seven staff members, whose hours were the equivalent of four full-time staff. We had one system administrator, three healthcare assistants, one nurse, Health Advisor Helen Musker and myself.CSHS were paramount to the speed with which the local system began. Following approval from the Trust’s chief executive officer we had adapted our electronic patient records (EPR) system, developed a standard operating procedure and trained staff, using a stepwise competency model, within just 1 day.In collaboration with the local laboratories we developed methods for the input of positive COVID-19 results into our EPR derivative.

    We ensured that labs would be able to cope with the increase in testing and that testing hubs had additional capacity. Testing sites and occupational health were asked to inform patients that if they tested positive they would be contacted by our teams.This initiative involved a multiagency system including local public health (PH) teams, local authority, North Cumbria and Morecambe Bay CCGs, Public Health England (PHE) and the military. If CSHS recognise more than one positive result in the same area/organisation, they flag this with PH at the daily incident management meeting and environmental health officers (EHOs) provide advice and guidance for the organisation. We have had an active role in the contact tracing for clusters in local general practices, providing essential information to PH to enable them to initiate outbreak control and provide accurate advice to the practices.

    We are an integral part in recognising cases in large organisations and ensuring prompt action is taken to stem the spread of the disease. The team have provided out-of-hours work to ensure timely and efficient action is taken for all contacts.The local contact tracing pilot has evolved and a database was established by local authorities. Our data fed directly into this from the end of May 2020. This enables the multiagency team to record data in one place, improving recognition of patterns of transmission.DiscussionCumbria is covered by three National Health Service Trusts, which meant accessing data outside of our Trust was challenging and took more time to establish.

    There are two CCGs for Cumbria, which meant discussions regarding testing were needed with both North and South CCGs and variations in provision had to be accounted for. There are six boroughs in Cumbria with different teams of EHOs working in each. With so many people involved, not only is there need for large-scale frequent communication across a multisystem team, there is also inevitable duplication of work.Lockdown is easing and sexual health clinics are increasing capacity in a new world of virtual appointments and reduced face-to-face consultations. Staff within the contact tracing team are now balancing their commitments across both teams to maintain their skills and keep abreast of the rapid developments within our service due to COVID-19.

    We are currently applying for funding from PH in order to second staff and backfill posts in sexual health.ConclusionCSHS have been able to lend our skills effectively to the local contact tracing efforts. We have expedited the contact tracing in Cumbria and provided crucial information to help contain outbreaks. It has had a positive effect on staff morale within the service and we have gained national recognition for our work. We have developed excellent relationships with our local PH team, PHE, Cumbria Council, EHOs and both CCGs.Cumbria has the infrastructure to meet the demands of a second wave of COVID-19.

    The beauty of this model is that if we are faced with a second lockdown, sexual health staff will inevitably be available to help with the increased demand for contact tracing. Our ambition is that this model will be replicated nationally..

    Vaniqa price comparison

    You have vaniqa price comparison to go to extreme lengths to find places on Earth that don’t reveal that they’re part of a water-rich planet. Even the highest and driest deserts, like the Atacama Plateau in South America, still get a minimum of a couple of millimeters of annual precipitation on average (although there are places where we don’t yet know what the average is because it’s simply not rained for years). And if you whip out your handy mass spectrometer on a desert walkabout the chances are that you’ll be able to detect at least a few atmospheric water molecules. Go elsewhere, and it’s hard to imagine anything but a water-logged world vaniqa price comparison. More than 70 percent of Earth’s surface is covered in oceans and roughly 97 percent of the surface water is in those oceans, leaving a scant 1 percent as freshwater.

    Water is also seldom static, whether it’s flowing in ocean currents or being evaporated and precipitated. Averaged out over the planet there is vaniqa price comparison about 100 centimeters of rainfall a year, but that’s across a total surface area of around 5.1x1018 square centimeters. In other words, doing the back-of-the-envelope calculation, some 510 trillion metric tons of water gets evaporated and then re-precipitated every year on Earth. But the catch is that we don’t really know where all of this water came from in the first place. For a long while our picture of the formation of a rocky planet like the Earth has involved a violent, hot assembly some vaniqa price comparison 4.5 billion years ago out of comparatively dry material in the inner solar system.

    Water would have come along later, with proposals for possible delivery by comets from the chill, frozen outer solar system, or by rocky but still volatile-rich meteoritic infall. But these options have proven tricky to justify completely for a variety of reasons. Comets, for instance, often (but not always) have a deuterium vaniqa price comparison concentration that doesn’t match what we see in Earth’s water—limiting their likely contribution. Similarly, water-rich rocky meteoritic material—so-called carbonaceous chondrites—have isotopic differences that could also limit how much they contributed to a young planet. At the same time, the representative type of material for building the entirety of a rocky Earth (and matching the planet’s overall isotopic composition in elements like oxygen and calcium) seems to closely resemble what’s called enstatite chondrite.

    Chunks of enstatite chondrite vaniqa price comparison are still around in the solar system, and occasionally fall as meteorites. But they’ve been thought to be too dry to be involved in Earth’s water supply. Now, in a work reported by Piani, et al. In the vaniqa price comparison journal Science, an analysis of the composition of 13 enstatite chondrite meteorite samples reveals a much higher than expected hydrogen content. Extrapolating from these numbers the researchers claim that if this is the type of protoplanetary material that built Earth, it could have resulted in a total, initial water content of at least three times the present mass of water in our oceans.

    The same material could have also provided a starter mix of atmospheric nitrogen to the young planet. This possibility vaniqa price comparison is enormously appealing for its relative simplicity. Our wet world was simply made this way from the very beginning, with little need to invoke any more complex evolution except for a small drizzling from comets and other outer solar system material. Whether or not this idea holds up to further scientific scrutiny, it’s a beautiful reminder that even the simplest things in our lives, like a glass of water or a shower in the morning, are actually windows into the deepest origins of everything we know..

    You have to go to extreme lengths to find places on Earth that don’t reveal that they’re online doctor vaniqa part of a water-rich planet. Even the highest and driest deserts, like the Atacama Plateau in South America, still get a minimum of a couple of millimeters of annual precipitation on average (although there are places where we don’t yet know what the average is because it’s simply not rained for years). And if you whip out your handy mass spectrometer on a desert walkabout the chances are that you’ll be able to detect at least a few atmospheric water molecules. Go elsewhere, and it’s online doctor vaniqa hard to imagine anything but a water-logged world. More than 70 percent of Earth’s surface is covered in oceans and roughly 97 percent of the surface water is in those oceans, leaving a scant 1 percent as freshwater.

    Water is also seldom static, whether it’s flowing in ocean currents or being evaporated and precipitated. Averaged out online doctor vaniqa over the planet there is about 100 centimeters of rainfall a year, but that’s across a total surface area of around 5.1x1018 square centimeters. In other words, doing the back-of-the-envelope calculation, some 510 trillion metric tons of water gets evaporated and then re-precipitated every year on Earth. But the catch is that we don’t really know where all of this water came from in the first place. For a long while our picture of the formation of a rocky online doctor vaniqa planet like the Earth has involved a violent, hot assembly some 4.5 billion years ago out of comparatively dry material in the inner solar system.

    Water would have come along later, with proposals for possible delivery by comets from the chill, frozen outer solar system, or by rocky but still volatile-rich meteoritic infall. But these options have proven tricky to justify completely for a variety of reasons. Comets, for instance, often (but not always) have online doctor vaniqa a deuterium concentration that doesn’t match what we see in Earth’s water—limiting their likely contribution. Similarly, water-rich rocky meteoritic material—so-called carbonaceous chondrites—have isotopic differences that could also limit how much they contributed to a young planet. At the same time, the representative type of material for building the entirety of a rocky Earth (and matching the planet’s overall isotopic composition in elements like oxygen and calcium) seems to closely resemble what’s called enstatite chondrite.

    Chunks of online doctor vaniqa enstatite chondrite are still around in the solar system, and occasionally fall as meteorites. But they’ve been thought to be too dry to be involved in Earth’s water supply. Now, in a work reported by Piani, et al. In the online doctor vaniqa journal Science, an analysis of the composition of 13 enstatite chondrite meteorite samples reveals a much higher than expected hydrogen content. Extrapolating from these numbers the researchers claim that if this is the type of protoplanetary material that built Earth, it could have resulted in a total, initial water content of at least three times the present mass of water in our oceans.

    The same material could have also provided a starter mix of atmospheric nitrogen to the young planet. This possibility is enormously appealing for online doctor vaniqa its relative simplicity. Our wet world was simply made this way from the very beginning, with little need to invoke any more complex evolution except for a small drizzling from comets and other outer solar system material. Whether or not this idea holds up to further scientific scrutiny, it’s a beautiful reminder that even the simplest things in our lives, like a glass of water or a shower in the morning, are actually windows into the deepest origins of everything we know..

  • Vaniqa cream price usa

    Où rencontrer Pasteur dans Dole

    A la façon du Circuit du Chat Perché qui permet de découvrir les sites les plus attractifs de Dole, Alain Marchal nous propose de déambuler dans certains lieux publics dolois...pour admirer statues, fresques trompe-l’œil, mosaïques ou bustes à l'effigie...

    > LIRE LA SUITE

  • Vaniqa cream price usa

    Où rencontrer Pasteur dans Dole

    A la façon du Circuit du Chat Perché qui permet de découvrir les sites les plus attractifs de Dole, Alain Marchal nous propose de déambuler dans certains lieux publics dolois...pour admirer statues, fresques trompe-l’œil, mosaïques ou bustes à l'effigie...

    > LIRE LA SUITE

  • Vaniqa cream price usa

    Visite passion

    Pendant les vacances , venez faire la connaissance de Louis PASTEUR, visitez sa maison natale à Dole et la salle scientifique exposant les découvertes de notre grand savant Jurassien.
    Les bénévoles des Amis de PASTEUR vous proposent une "visite passion...

    > LIRE LA SUITE

  • Vaniqa cream price usa

    Visite passion

    Pendant les vacances , venez faire la connaissance de Louis PASTEUR, visitez sa maison natale à Dole et la salle scientifique exposant les découvertes de notre grand savant Jurassien.
    Les bénévoles des Amis de PASTEUR vous proposent une "visite passion...

    > LIRE LA SUITE

  • Vaniqa cream price usa

    Louis Pasteur et le ver à soie :


    Une exposition présentera à la Maison natale des aspects actuels de l'utilisation de la soie, dans les domaines industriels et techniques, dans la création artistique, avec un clin d'oeil aux travaux de Pasteur sur les maladies des vers à soie en...

    > LIRE LA SUITE

  • Vaniqa cream price usa

    Visite passion

    Pendant les vacances , venez faire la connaissance de Louis PASTEUR, visitez sa maison natale à Dole et la salle scientifique exposant les découvertes de notre grand savant Jurassien.
    Les bénévoles des Amis de PASTEUR vous proposent une "visite passion...

    > LIRE LA SUITE